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Articles | Popular | Future

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

New, Notable and Nearly Missed

Read "New, Notable and Nearly Missed" reviewed by Phil Barnes

One of the great pleasures of the holiday season is taking stock of the last 12 months, comparing notes with friends, investigating their recommendations and catching up with some of those releases that you never quite got round to. The falling cost of an independent release has meant that it is easier than ever for a musician to get their work out there, but probably the hardest it has been to get any meaningful attention from a fragmented media. All ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Jack DeJohnette at the Byrdcliffe Barn, Woodstock, N.Y

Read "Jack DeJohnette at the Byrdcliffe Barn, Woodstock, N.Y" reviewed by Peter Occhiogrosso

Jack DeJohnette Byrdcliffe Barn Woodstock, NY August 13, 2016 When the lights went out, the power came on. Drummer Jack DeJohnette was scheduled to give a solo piano concert at the Byrdcliffe Barn--a century-old wooden structure-turned-concert venue--that had been part of the original Byrdcliffe Arts Colony in Woodstock, N.Y.--but ten minutes before show time, following an ear-splitting crack like a boxful of M-80s exploding at once, the barn was flooded ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jack DeJohnette: Return

Read "Return" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

The only thing that Jack DeJohnette seems to have forgotten in his maturing years, is that, by the law of nature, he is supposed to be slowing down. Instead, as the composer/multi-instrumentalist heads toward his mid-seventies, he is as productive as he has ever been in his long, celebrated career. His releases over the past twelve months, include In Movement (ECM, 2016), a probing trio collection with saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and bassist/electronic artist Matthew Garrison, the raucous quintet outing Made ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jack DeJohnette/Ravi Coltrane/Matthew Garrison: In Movement

Read "In Movement" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

There is something of the “six degrees of separation" theory at work in this newly formed trio, led loosely, by the great Jack DeJohnette. The drummer/multi-instrumentalist works in the company of saxophonist Ravi Coltrane whose lineage is well known, and bassist/electronic artist Matthew Garrison whose father Jimmy Garrison was the bassist in John Coltrane's classic quartet. And, of course, DeJohnette, early in his career, played with the fathers of both of his trio mates. In Movement opens ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Carla Bley & Jack DeJohnette: ECM Trios

Read "Carla Bley & Jack DeJohnette: ECM Trios" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Two different approaches to the trio, led by veteran ECM bandleaders. Big band composer/pianist Carla Bley continues her recent run of chamber ensemble recordings, reconvening her trio with saxophonist Andy Sheppard and bassist Steve Swallow, most recently heard on Trios (ECM, 2013). The grouping gives much more focus on her piano playing than her large group projects, where she was composer first, accompanist (and soloist) second. Drummer/composer Jack DeJohnette introduces a new trio with saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and electric bassist ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jack DeJohnette: Made in Chicago

Read "Made in Chicago" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Drummer Jack DeJohnette reunites with his longtime comrades emanating from Chicago's fabled Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), founded by pianist Muhal Richard Abrams in 1965. This live outing recorded at Millennium Park in 2013 was part of the Chicago Jazz Festival and signifies the musicians' inaugural performance as a quintet, paralleling the AACM's 50th anniversary. The album as a whole contains the anticipated sensitivities, nu-jazz compositional characterizations and improvisational ingenuity documented or inferred within the ...

REDISCOVERY

Jack DeJohnette's Directions: New Rags

Read "Jack DeJohnette's Directions: New Rags" reviewed by John Kelman

Jack DeJohnette's DirectionsNew RagsECM Records1977 Today's Rediscovery is an album that, despite never being released officially on CD, is a relatively regular play chez Kelman, getting spun at least a couple times every year. New Rags (ECM, 1977), the third--and, sadly, final--recording by drummer Jack DeJohnette's Directions group, pares down the quintet of its second album and ECM debut to a quartet, where Cosmic Chicken bassist Peter Warren is replaced by Mike Richmond and keyboardist ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Jack DeJohnette: Made in Chicago

Read "Made in Chicago" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

At one point on Made In Chicago, drummer--and occasional pianist--Jack DeJohnette announces, “We'd like to do something spontaneous for you." By then, spontaneity is a foregone conclusion. With a discography that includes almost two-hundred recordings, DeJohnette is best known among more casual listeners as one third of pianist Keith Jarrett's long-time trio. Significant though the role has been, it hardly represents the scope of his career or his musical proclivities. In 1965, along a group of local Chicago musicians and ...

INTERVIEWS

Jack DeJohnette: Painting With Sticks

Read "Jack DeJohnette: Painting With Sticks" reviewed by George Colligan

[ Editor's Note: The following interview is reprinted from George Colligan's blog, Jazztruth]The name Jack DeJohnette is synonymous with modern jazz drumming. Many know him for his years spent with the Keith Jarrett Trio, but he first came to prominence with Charles Lloyd and Miles Davis in the '60s. He's always in demand as a sideman-- although you wouldn't call Jack DeJohnette to merely be a sideman--his musical contribution to any project is such that he is always ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Chicago Jazz Festival 2013

Read "Chicago Jazz Festival 2013" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Chicago Jazz FestivalChicago, ILAugust 29-September 1, 2013Chicago is...You get the feeling it is a jazz city when, waiting in line at the airport, you overhear a conversation about Anthony Braxton's first meeting with Derek Bailey. Then, your suspicions are confirmed in the taxi, on the drive to the 2013 Chicago Jazz Festival when the cabbie engages you in a discussion of the major works of Eddie Harris and Gene Ammons. From Louis Armstrong's travels up ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Jack DeJohnette: Special Edition

Read "Jack DeJohnette: Special Edition" reviewed by John Kelman

With drummer/keyboardist Jack DeJohnette entering his eighth decade on planet earth, he's managed to accomplish what few other drummers have. Recipient of the 2012 NEA Jazz Masters Award, there are few jazz drummer s alive today who can cite as many recordings as the Chicago-born DeJohnette can, nor are there many who have been on such a diverse stylistic cross-section. DeJohnette, now a legend himself, was picked up by a large number of then-high profile musicians in the early days ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Jack DeJohnette 70th Birthday Party: San Francisco, CA, September 5, 2012

Read "Jack DeJohnette 70th Birthday Party: San Francisco, CA, September 5, 2012" reviewed by Bill Leikam

Jack DeJohnette, Chick Corea, and Stanley ClarkeYoshi's Jazz ClubSan Francisco, CASeptember 5, 2012It was a sold out house of 365 people on the opening night for drummer Jack DeJohnette's 70th birthday celebration concert at Yoshi's Jazz Club in San Francisco, California. DeJohnette brought two friends--pianist Chick Corea and bassist Stanley Clarke--to add to the festivities. Shortly before they made their appearance, Clarke's bass was brought out onstage. People hushed and nearby someone said, “It's starting." ...