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Lowell Davidson: Trio

Read "Trio" reviewed by Lyn Horton

The seamless blending of musicians is often rare, especially in the instance of improvisation, because inherent in the situation is the heightened responsiveness of the musicians to each other.  In the re-released 1965 recording entitled Trio, from the late pianist Lowell Davidson with bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Milford Graves, the interaction among musicians is cultivated and beautifully expressed.

The language which the trio speaks has the same syntax.  The phrasing is isolated and abstract.  Just ...

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Lowell Davidson: Lowell Davidson Trio

Read "Lowell Davidson Trio" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

Pianist Lowell Davidson was a man of many parts. A biochemist, he found his muse in music and a strong one it was. He not only played the piano, he also played drums with the New York Art Quintet. He was into avant-garde and free jazz forays that he raised to a new level through his manipulation of notes. The last is evidenced in the marvelous imagery that rises on this, his only record. Lowell had Gary Peacock on bass ...

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Lowell Davidson: Lowell Davidson Trio

Read "Lowell Davidson Trio" reviewed by Raul d'Gama Rose

Lowell Davidson was one of those quintessential artists. A pianist possessed of great virtuosity, he was also a Harvard-educated biochemist and his musical art--both compositions and performance--and emerged from a confluence of the two. Davidson inhabited a rarified space. He understood and played with such harmonic sophistication that he may be compared in this respect only to Thelonious Monk, Herbie Nichols and Don Pullen. As a scientist-musician he believed that musical tones, if properly employed, could influence the evolution of ...


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