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ALBUM REVIEWS

The Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra: The L.A. Treasures Project:Live at Alvas Showroom

Read "The L.A. Treasures Project:Live at Alvas Showroom" reviewed by Jack Bowers

The “L.A. Treasures" heralded herein are singers Ernie Andrews (eighty-six years young when the album was recorded in September 2013) and Barbara Morrison (a relative novice at sixty-one). The idea to record sprang from rehearsals earlier that year by the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra in which Andrews and Morrison were invited to sit in. Afterward, co-leader John Clayton writes, it was decided that “we need to document these artists . . . these treasures!" What a splendid idea! An idea, in ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

John Clayton: Parlor Series, Vol. 1

Read "Parlor Series, Vol. 1" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

The Parlor Series was conceived of long before it came into existence. Bassist/Composer/Arranger/Educator extraordinaire John Clayton had long hoped to explore the piano-bass duo medium on record. He had admired albums like This One's For Blanton (Pablo, 1974), which paired his mentor--bass legend Ray Brown--with the great Duke Ellington, and Steal Away (Verve, 1995), which brought bassist Charlie Haden and pianist Hank Jones together in service of spirituals. Clayton even told Jones how much he loved that album, going so ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Bottom’s Up: John Clayton, Rodney Whitaker, Victor Wooten at the Mesa Arts Center

Read "Bottom’s Up: John Clayton, Rodney Whitaker, Victor Wooten at the Mesa Arts Center" reviewed by Patricia Myers

Bottom's Up: John Clayton, Rodney Whitaker, Victor Wooten Mesa Arts Center Mesa, AZ September 27, 2013 West Coast bassist John Clayton created a trio called “Bottom's Up" with fellow bassists Rodney Whitaker and Victor Wooten for a 90-minute concert that showcased their collective and individual talent. An audience opting to attend a concert by just three bass players, with no horn, piano, guitar or drums, likely would bring a positive bias for that instrument. If ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

The Clayton Brothers: The New Song And Dance

Read "The New Song And Dance" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

There was a time when jazz and dance were linked in the minds of the general public. As each evolved, this all changed: nobody was getting up to dance for bop--save, perhaps, Thelonious Monk cutting a rug mid-performance--and big bands focused on their music more than making a danceable product. The literal act of dancing might have been removed from close association with this music, but a segment of the music never altered its dance-worthy DNA. Foot ...

MEGAPHONE

Battle of the Bands

Read "Battle of the Bands" reviewed by AAJ Staff

By John Clayton If true battles were fought the way some people imagine the Clayton-Hamilton and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra are to duke it out this month (more on the “other" Duke in a moment), we might just be a world with fewer global conflicts.

What you will witness, when the two bands perform on Jazz at Lincoln Center's Rose Theater stage together, will be two bands with a high level of mutual ...


Summertime Magic

Statik Link captures the sound of Soul and Jazz that was popular in the 1970s with a modern twist. The trumpet, saxophones, and drums were recorded with vintage microphones for a tone like no other.

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