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ALBUM REVIEWS

Horace Tapscott with the Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra and the Great Voice of UGMAA: Why Don't You Listen? - Live at LACMA, 1998

Read "Why Don't You Listen? - Live at LACMA, 1998" reviewed by Mark Corroto

In every decade since the 1960s, dedicated listeners have called for the world to get hip to the music of Horace Tapscott. In 1963 he formed the Pan-Afrikan Peoples Arkestra in Los Angeles. Like Chicago's Association For The Advancement Of Creative Musicians (AACM) and St. Louis' Black Artists Group (BAG), Tapscott's collective was formed to serve his local scene. Also, and this is probably more significant, his efforts were focused on community organizing and the empowerment of his people. His ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Horace Tapscott with the Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra: Live at I.C.U.U.

Read "Live at I.C.U.U." reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Twenty years after his death, pianist-composer Horace Tapscott is receiving the accolades that largely passed him by at the peak of his career. Firmly ensconced in the Los Angeles jazz scene, his recording career as a leader began in 1969 when his quintet released The Giant Is Awakened (Flying Dutchman). Aiee! The Phantom (Arabesque, 1996) was the last album issued in his lifetime, and there have been very few posthumous releases. 2019 has seen a resurgence of interest in Tapscott's ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Horace Tapscott: The Dark Tree

Read "The Dark Tree" reviewed by Chris May

The year of writing this review, 2019, is the thirtieth anniversary of the recording of The Dark Tree. It is also the twentieth anniversary of the passing of Horace Tapscott, a forgotten master of politically engaged African American spiritual jazz. The album, which is among Tapscott's finest, is crying out for a 2019 anniversary reissue. STOP PRESS! 7/25/19: The album has been reissued. Of course, to describe Tapscott as “forgotten" is only true of mainstream jazz history. His ...

RADIO

October Birthday Salutes

Read "October Birthday Salutes" reviewed by Marc Cohn

Towards the end of every month, we celebrate the birthdays of famous and not so famous jazz musicians, physically or spiritually living. This month we feature Art Blakey and Thelonious Monk. Art's centennial is in 2019; so consider this as a warm-up. In addition, we are able to celebrate Horace Tapscott in style because we have a rare vinyl pressing of his Songs of the Unsung on (Interplay)--we hear that an available CD of this has been edited and incomplete. ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Horace Tapscott: The Tapscott Sessions, Volumes 1-8

Read "Horace Tapscott: The Tapscott Sessions, Volumes 1-8" reviewed by Frank Rubolino

Horace Tapscott began his musical career as a trombonist, and during the early part of the 1950s played in the Gerald Wilson big band. It wasn't until his US Army tour of duty in the late 1950s that he studied piano. He subsequently gave up the trombone due to an automobile accident while on tour with Lionel Hampton and settled in 1961 in Los Angeles to concentrate on piano. Tapscott came to an obscure form of prominence in that period ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Horace Tapscott: The Dark Tree

Read "The Dark Tree" reviewed by Troy Collins

Due to his limited exposure outside of his native Los Angeles, pianist Horace Tapscott was largely unnoticed by the mainstream jazz press throughout his lengthy career. A galvanizing force in the Los Angeles scene, Tapscott co-founded the Underground Musicians Association (UGMA), later known as the Union of God's Musicians and Artists Ascension (UGMAA) in 1961, which eventually lead to the formation of his Pan-African Peoples Arkestra. Beyond the valiant support of Nimbus Records, little documentation of Tapscott's oeuvre exists, other ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Horace Tapscott: The Dark Tree

Read "The Dark Tree" reviewed by Chris May

The year of writing this review, 2019, is the thirtieth anniversary of the recording of The Dark Tree. It is also the twentieth anniversary of the passing of Horace Tapscott, a forgotten master of politically engaged African American spiritual jazz. The album, which is among Tapscott's finest, is crying out for a 2019 anniversary reissue. STOP PRESS 7/25/19: The album has just been reissued. Of course, to describe Tapscott as “forgotten" is only true of mainstream jazz history. ...