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Daily articles carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. Read our popular and future articles.

RADIO

Roots Magic, Audio Cave Artists & Alan Braufman

Read "Roots Magic, Audio Cave Artists & Alan Braufman" reviewed by Maurice Hogue

A new release by the Italian Quartet Roots Magic is always welcome. Their contemporary and improvisatory approach to old blues tunes and the way they always put their own touch on the music of avant-garde jazz composers is kind of unique on the European scene. Take Root Among the Stars, out on Clean Feed, should be right up there with the best of 2020 releases. Also from Italy comes music by the The Auanders, a larger ensemble formed initially for ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Horace Tapscott with the Pan Afrikan People’s Arkestra: Ancestral Echoes – The Covina Sessions, 1976

Read "Ancestral Echoes – The Covina Sessions, 1976" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

When pianist/composer/conductor Horace Tapscott founded the Pan Afrikan People's Arkestra (PAPA) in 1961, it was by design a support collective for all arts, bringing pride to the black community, specifically that of South-Central Los Angeles. PAPA signified social activism, teaching empowerment, and advocating Tapscott's belief that channeling African ancestral roots was a key to succeeding. Tapscott, who died in 1999, had forsaken wider recognition to bring music and teaching to his community, but his catalog has seen a revived interest ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Horace Tapscott with the Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra and the Great Voice of UGMAA: Why Don't You Listen? - Live at LACMA, 1998

Read "Why Don't You Listen? - Live at LACMA, 1998" reviewed by Mark Corroto

In every decade since the 1960s, dedicated listeners have called for the world to get hip to the music of Horace Tapscott. In 1963 he formed the Pan-Afrikan Peoples Arkestra in Los Angeles. Like Chicago's Association For The Advancement Of Creative Musicians (AACM) and St. Louis' Black Artists Group (BAG), Tapscott's collective was formed to serve his local scene. Also, and this is probably more significant, his efforts were focused on community organizing and the empowerment of his people. His ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Horace Tapscott with the Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra: Live at I.C.U.U.

Read "Live at I.C.U.U." reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Twenty years after his death, pianist-composer Horace Tapscott is receiving the accolades that largely passed him by at the peak of his career. Firmly ensconced in the Los Angeles jazz scene, his recording career as a leader began in 1969 when his quintet released The Giant Is Awakened (Flying Dutchman). Aiee! The Phantom (Arabesque, 1996) was the last album issued in his lifetime, and there have been very few posthumous releases. 2019 has seen a resurgence of interest in Tapscott's ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Horace Tapscott: The Dark Tree

Read "The Dark Tree" reviewed by Chris May

The year of writing this review, 2019, is the thirtieth anniversary of the recording of The Dark Tree. It is also the twentieth anniversary of the passing of Horace Tapscott, a forgotten master of politically engaged African American spiritual jazz. The album, which is among Tapscott's finest, is crying out for a 2019 anniversary reissue. STOP PRESS! 7/25/19: The album has been reissued. Of course, to describe Tapscott as “forgotten" is only true of mainstream jazz history. His ...

RADIO

October Birthday Salutes

Read "October Birthday Salutes" reviewed by Marc Cohn

Towards the end of every month, we celebrate the birthdays of famous and not so famous jazz musicians, physically or spiritually living. This month we feature Art Blakey and Thelonious Monk. Art's centennial is in 2019; so consider this as a warm-up. In addition, we are able to celebrate Horace Tapscott in style because we have a rare vinyl pressing of his Songs of the Unsung on (Interplay)--we hear that an available CD of this has been edited and incomplete. ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Horace Tapscott: The Tapscott Sessions, Volumes 1-8

Read "Horace Tapscott: The Tapscott Sessions, Volumes 1-8" reviewed by Frank Rubolino

Horace Tapscott began his musical career as a trombonist, and during the early part of the 1950s played in the Gerald Wilson big band. It wasn't until his US Army tour of duty in the late 1950s that he studied piano. He subsequently gave up the trombone due to an automobile accident while on tour with Lionel Hampton and settled in 1961 in Los Angeles to concentrate on piano. Tapscott came to an obscure form of prominence in that period ...


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