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ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: Dedication

Read "Dedication" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Veteran reed player Steve Slagle delivers another exciting jazz album in this sequel to Alto Manhattan (Panorama Records, 2016). The core band is much the same: pianist Lawrence Fields, drummer Bill Stewart, and Roman Diaz playing conga and percussion on several tracks. Frequent playing partner Scott Colley joins in on bass, and the special guest is long time friend guitarist Dave Stryker. Stryker and Slagle have co-led a band for many years, and the guitarist brings sympathetic support and fiery ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: Dedication

Read "Dedication" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Steve Slagle is one of those players that's often overlooked yet hard to forget. Why this sixty-five-year-old saxophonist who's constantly bringing energy and a spirit of exploration to the fore doesn't get the ink or marquees that come to his musical peers ten years his senior or several decades his junior is something of a head-scratcher. If you've seen him as a sideman, encountered him co-leading a band with guitarist Dave Stryker, checked out his duo work with pianist Bill ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: Alto Manhattan

Read "Alto Manhattan" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Alto Manhattan is Latino for the New York City neighborhood “upper Manhattan" (or “the heights"). It's also where veteran alto saxophonist/flutist Steve Slagle lives, making for a nice bit of wordplay in the album title. This is a well-balanced program, with just a bit more Latin tinge than average. “Family" launches the set with Latin-flavored hard bop, featuring fiery interplay between Slagle's alto sax and guest Joe Lovano's tenor sax (guest conga player Roman Diaz also makes his first appearance). ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: Alto Manhattan

Read "Alto Manhattan" reviewed by Roger Farbey

Alto Manhattan is a confident and intelligent follow-up to saxophonist Steve Slagle's 2012 album Evensong. Kicking-off with a blues head (but with a twist) “Family" is a no-nonsense stormer benefitting from guests Joe Lovano on tenor sax and Roman Diaz on congas and some good tenor / alto “jousting" towards the end of the track. “Alto Manhattan" is Latino for the NYC area in which Steve lives, otherwise known as Upper Manhattan or The Heights. Here it's represented by a ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle & Bill O'Connell: The Power Of Two

Read "The Power Of Two" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

The initial impetus behind the creation of this recording was the passing of Kenny Drew Jr., an exceptional and underappreciated pianist who saxophonist Steve Slagle worked with, both in the Mingus Big Band and on one of his own leader dates--Reincarnation (SteepleChase, 1994). On the day his friend passed, Slagle penned “KD JR.," later sending it to Bill O'Connell, another of his piano-playing colleagues. That got the ball rolling for this, the first duo date in Slagle's discography.

ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: Evensong

Read "Evensong" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Saxophonist Steve Slagle is a consummate leader often pegged as a sideman; with a résumé that includes stints with big band legends like Woody Herman and Lionel Hampton, left-of-center trailblazers like pianist Carla Bley, Latin giants like Ray Barretto and modern day marvels like tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano, it's easy to see why some people may look at him as a side dish, but outings under his own name mark him as main course material. His outstanding ...

BOOK REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: Scenes, Songs & Solos - A Composition and Improvisation Workbook for the Creative Musician

Read "Steve Slagle: Scenes, Songs & Solos - A Composition and Improvisation Workbook for the Creative Musician" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Scenes, Songs & Solos: A Composition and Improvisation Workbook for the Creative MusicianSteve SlaglePaperback; 139 pagesISBN: 97819361822882Schaffner Press2011 There's no substitute for experience in the world of jazz, and saxophonist Steve Slagle has experience in spades. Slagle has been putting his horn to good use, working with the likes of bassist Charlie Haden, saxophonist Joe Lovano, pianist Carla Bley, the Mingus Big Band, and many others over ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Steve Slagle at The Turning Point Café

Read "Steve Slagle at The Turning Point Café" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Steve Slagle The Turning Point Café Piermont, NY July 21, 2008

Tenor and soprano saxophonist John Richmond’s knack for matching distinguished guest soloists and stimulating house rhythm sections is one of the salient characteristics of the Turning Point Café’s jazz series. For the venue located only thirty-five miles from New York City in Piermont, NY, Richmond draws on a large pool of experienced players who are hungry to blow with their peers. Alto saxophonist/flutist ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: New New York

Read "New New York" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Veteran saxophonist, group leader and much in demand session ace Steve Slagle, derives inspiration from the City that he inhabits on New New York. Throughout this record, Slagle exhibits a breezy tone as an alto saxophonist who also incorporates a gritty edge amid an often-angular attack brimming with serpentine lines and lofty thematic inventions. Here, the artist receives some noteworthy assistance from sometimes employer, saxophonist Joe Lovano, and vibraphonist extraordinaire Joe Locke. Yet many of the accolades should be awarded ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: Steve Slagle Plays Monk

Read "Steve Slagle Plays Monk" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Well, let's admit it; the whole idea of doing tribute albums has really gotten out of hand recently. But if you're going to do this type of thing, then saxophonist Steve Slagle and his talented crew have the right idea. For starters, a piano is nowhere to be heard from, with the chameleon-like guitar of Dave Stryker taking on the chordal functions. Right there we avoid any inclinations to produce a mere clone of the original. And instead of delivering ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Steve Slagle: Steve Slagel Plays Monk

Read "Steve Slagel Plays Monk" reviewed by Mark Corroto

I propose passing a law that requires every jazz recording to include at least one Thelonious Monk song. The reason is not that Monk is my favorite composer, but that Monk’s music is some of the most difficult to play. Maybe not technically difficult for jazz professionals, but rhythmically challenging and isn’t it so easy hear a Monk song done wrong. Several tribute recordings worth hearing include, Paul Motian’s Monk In Motian, Danilo Perez’s Latin spiced Panamonk, of course Steve ...


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