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IN PICTURES
IN PICTURES
ALBUM REVIEWS

Archie Shepp: Archie Shepp And The New York Contemporary Five

Read "Archie Shepp And The New York Contemporary Five" reviewed by Chris Mosey

The New Thing is now old hat; all those squawking saxophones, blipping trumpets and discordant piano explorations a thing of the past. With its arrival in the early 1960s, jazz reached the end of its historical road. The New Thing wasn't The Shape Of Jazz To Come, as an Ornette Coleman album title had it. It was simply the final stop on the music's path from New Orleans. This, and all the other stops, could be revisited ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Archie Shepp and Joachim Kuhn: Wo!man

Read "Archie Shepp and Joachim Kuhn: Wo!man" reviewed by Chris May

Archie Shepp & Joachim KühnWo!manArchie Ball2011 At first glance, the pairing of veteran American saxophonist Archie Shepp and German pianist Joachim Kühn seems an unlikely one. But Wo!man is not the first time the two have performed together. Two or three decades back--Shepp says that he cannot now remember the year exactly--the saxophonist worked with Kühn in a band led by Finnish drummer Edward Vesala. It is a real pleasure, Shepp ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Archie Shepp: The New York Contemporary Five

Read "The New York Contemporary Five" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

In 1963, cornetist Don Cherry , tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp , drummer J.C. Moses, alto saxophonist John Tchicai and bassist Don Moore performed at the Jazzhus Montmartre in Copenhagen . At the time, Cherry was just coming off from playing with Ornette Coleman, while Shepp was transitioning from Bill Dixon. Tchicai had met Cherry and Shepp in New York and become part of the collective. Cherry was the most assured of the five, having developed and honed his ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Archie Shepp: The New York Contemporary Five

Read "The New York Contemporary Five" reviewed by John Barron

Although saxophonist Archie Shepp is listed as the leader of this release, The New York Contemporary Five was really a collective; a short-lived, free jazz super-group from the early 1960s. The band, with a front line of Shepp, cornetist Don Cherry and alto saxophonist John Tchicai, was recorded live at the famed Jazzhus Montmartre in Copenhagen, Denmark on November 15, 1963. Originally released as a two-volume set on the Sonet label, volume one of that set is reissued here for ...

INTERVIEWS

Archie Shepp: Knowing the Life

Read "Archie Shepp: Knowing the Life" reviewed by Clifford Allen

Saxophonist, pianist, writer and composer Archie Shepp was born in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida May 24, 1937 and grew up in Philadelphia playing with hard-bop luminaries such as Lee Morgan and Bobby Timmons. A move to New York in the 1960s and early gigs with Cecil Taylor aligned him with the avant-garde, leading to work with John Coltrane and a recording contract for Impulse!. Shepp's travels have taken him to Africa and Europe and his musical engagements have been diverse, capturing ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Archie Shepp: Kwanza

Read "Kwanza" reviewed by Chris May

Albert Ayler flamed like phosphorous for a few years, spoke like an Old Testament prophet, wore leather trousers and died young in mysterious circumstances. Archie Shepp burned just as bright, but has lived to a ripe age, growing to embrace the mainstream, and has had one foot in academe for much of his career. The two saxophonists, along with John Coltrane, personified the Impulse! label during its giddy zenith, but Ayler's highly marketable legend, now of mythic proportions, has grown ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Archie Shepp: Kwanza

Read "Kwanza" reviewed by Norman Weinstein

This big band session collects all of Archie Shepp's virtues as a composer, saxophonist and jazz dramaticist and puts them into one glorious package. Like the African-American holiday this album is named after, it's an imposing hybrid form, a sprawling mass of experimental jazz circa 1969 sharply peppered with funk, blues, and myriad musical evocations of an imaginary “Africa." Not only was Shepp consistently soloing with as much dynamic originality as he would ever do--gruff, hoarse, but ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Archie Shepp/Siegfried Kessler: First Take

Read "First Take" reviewed by Germein Linares

Paired with German pianist Siegfried Kessler, Archie Shepp finds himself in an evocative mood on First Take. Recorded live in France, they perform an intimate and at times haunting set of six tunes. The disc begins with the 22-minute sojourn of “Les Matin de Noirs" ("The Morning of the Blacks"). A surprisingly smooth ride, considering its length, the opening number goes a long way to ease and convince the listener of the album's gentle vibe. Shepp never pushes and Kessler ...

INTERVIEWS

Archie Shepp: The Cries of My People

Read "Archie Shepp: The Cries of My People" reviewed by Ollie Bivens

If Trane is the father, Pharoah: the sun, and Ayler: the holy ghost, Archie Shepp is the uncle that no one mentions. Shepp, an outspoken critic of jazz and an advocate of social revolution, has endured significant industry persecution for his awareness. And while the acerbic edge to his music has muted in recent years, his civic opinions have certainly not.

All About Jazz: What happened to the black audience for jazz?

Archie Shepp: I can ...

REASSESSING

Archie Shepp: Attica Blues

Read "Archie Shepp: Attica Blues" reviewed by Trevor MacLaren

Archie Shepp Attica Blues Impulse! 1972

In November of 2004, the world stage is set on the American election. In a post-9/11 world the masses have become paranoid, tense and angry. At the forefront is George W. Bush's foreign policy. Thirty years ago artists found themselves in a similar plight with Richard M. Nixon's home and foreign policies as well. With the push of attack in Vietnam, the murders at Kent State and violence ...


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