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THE VINYL POST

Beloved of The Sky

Read "Beloved of The Sky" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Back in the late '80s, the life cycle of the vinyl record seemed to have run its course. Promoters of the compact disc had lulled people into the ideal that the little silver discs would offer perfect sound forever. Fast forward to today's marketplace and it's ironic to see new releases as available in both CD and vinyl formats. While the reissue concerns were the first ones to jump on board the record resurgence, several new music labels have started ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: Beloved of The Sky

Read "Beloved of The Sky" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

For those not familiar with the Tyner-esque bop flourish and Horace Silver-like subtlety of Canadian pianist/composer Renee Rosnes, then the rollicking Beloved of the Sky may be the disc to begin the discovery. Recorded live at NY's Smoke club, the recording features the free-swinging quintet of Rosnes, saxophonist Chris Potter (who is especially frisky and acrobatic here), vibraphonist Steve Nelson, drummer Lenny White, and bassist Peter Washington. An alum of the 1980's Canadian jazz scene with nine Blue ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: Written in the Rocks

Read "Written in the Rocks" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Always a major talent who has transcended the hokum that usually accompanies the precept of women jazz musicians, pianist Renee Rosnes offers a mature and individualistic touch that has been recorded on far too few occasions over the years. In fact, prior to this fabulous session, Rosnes' last U.S. release was a 2010 duo set with husband Bill Charlap on Blue Note. Around the same time she gathered together Steve Nelson, Peter Washington, and Bill Stewart for the Japanese only ...

LIVE REVIEWS

The Phantom Band at Birdland

Read "The Phantom Band at Birdland" reviewed by Tyran Grillo

The Phantom Band Birdland New York, NY November 21, 2014 When pianist Renee Rosnes, trumpeter Randy Brecker, tenorist Jimmy Greene, bassist George Mraz, and drummer Al Foster took to the Birdland stage to present its “Music of Joe Henderson" program, one thing was clear: these cats understand their history--Rosnes not least of all, having played in Henderson's quartet from 1987 until illness kept his reeds at bay. Foster, too, had backed Henderson in a variety ...

NEW YORK BEAT

Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola: Women In Jazz

Read "Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola: Women In Jazz" reviewed by Nick Catalano

The autumn jazz season has begun in New York and the energy at Lincoln Center continues to accelerate. This week I visited Dizzy's to catch the 3rd annual Diet Coke Women In Jazz Festival and found the club bulging with SRO crowds. Renee Rosnes (the new Mrs. Bill Charlap) debuted a new quartet and the group mirrored the excitement of what has surely become Gotham's hottest jazz venue.

This year's Women in Jazz celebration drew such veterans as ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: Life on Earth

Read "Life on Earth" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

On her eighth recording as a leader for Blue Note, pianist and composer Renee Rosnes presents a pan global festival that has far reaching impact. Utilizing a revolving cast of characters on various numbers, Rosnes manages to synchronize the various “world music” influences in a seamless manner that never falls into the “mixed bag” syndrome. Old friends (husband and drummer Billy Drummond, saxophonists Chris Potter and Walt Weiskopf, bassist Christian McBride, etc.) mix with new friends bringing in African, Brazilian, ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: Life On Earth

Read "Life On Earth" reviewed by Jim Santella

With chants and drumbeats from around the world, Renee Rosnes has applied a theme to her latest album by integrating mainstream jazz with creative international elements. Regional characteristics from specific areas of Asia, Africa, North and South America are clearly distinguishable, while the unifying thread of her original piano counterpoint ties them together. Seven of the nine compositions are originals. Medieval Spain colors the landscape through Manuel de Falla's “Nana," while Fran Landesman's “Ballad of the Sad Young Men" serves ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: Life on Earth

Read "Life on Earth" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

On her eighth recording as a leader for Blue Note, pianist and composer Renee Rosnes presents a pan global festival that has far reaching impact. Utilizing a revolving cast of characters on various numbers, Rosnes manages to synchronize the various “world music” influences in a seamless manner that never falls into the “mixed bag” syndrome. Old friends (husband and drummer Billy Drummond, saxophonists Chris Potter and Walt Weiskopf, bassist Christian McBride, etc.) mix with new friends bringing in African, Brazilian, ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: Life On Earth

Read "Life On Earth" reviewed by Jim Santella

With chants and drumbeats from around the world, Renee Rosnes has applied a theme to her latest album by integrating mainstream jazz with creative international elements. Regional characteristics from specific areas of Asia, Africa, North and South America are clearly distinguishable, while the unifying thread of her original piano counterpoint ties them together. Seven of the nine compositions are originals. Medieval Spain colors the landscape through Manuel de Falla's “Nana," while Fran Landesman's “Ballad of the Sad Young Men" serves ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: With a Little Help From My Friends

Read "With a Little Help From My Friends" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Very simply put, pianist Renee Rosnes has developed into one of this current generation’s finest mainstream artists regardless of gender. Making the most of her high-profile gig with Joe Henderson back in the ‘80s, Rosnes’ development was then artfully denoted over the course of six Blue Note albums released between 1990 and 1999. This is a fine compilation that brings together some outstanding and varied performances, while adding a few unreleased nuggets that are primed for excavation.

In a trio ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: With A Little Help From My Friends

Read "With A Little Help From My Friends" reviewed by Jim Santella

While her compilation spans nearly eleven years and includes various musical companions, Renee Rosnes seldom veers from her established sound. The pianist's timeless formula centers on her crisp improvising technique. Not one to make jokes or approach a situation lightly, Rosnes applies a determined effort for every tune – straight from the heart and powerful. Her modern mainstream aura has enabled the pianist to wax creatively in the company of quite a few standout artists. With Chris Potter, she's on ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Renee Rosnes: Art & Soul

Read "Art & Soul" reviewed by David Adler

On her sixth Blue Note release, burning pianist Renee Rosnes is joined by drummer/husband Billy Drummond and bassist Scott Colley, whose ubiquity of late threatens to reach Dave Holland proportions. Whereas previous outings have stressed Rosnes’s own compositions, this disc contains only two originals—and they happen to be my two favorite cuts. The up-tempo “Romp" is based on simple triadic motifs, giving it a uniquely bright sound. During her solo Rosnes reaches an inspired height, quoting “Now’s The Time" at ...