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Tim Armacost: Time Being

Read "Time Being" reviewed by Geno Thackara

From the initial trotting bass solo smoothly segueing into a toe-tapping slice of timeless bop, Time Being's opening jaunt makes an introduction fascinatingly tricky and inviting. Those familiar with the wide-ranging saxophonist Tim Armacost, however, know he's got much more still up his sleeve--and that no matter how complicated things get, they'll stay listenable and accessible enough for any taste. The record is his first on Whirlwind Recordings, and it is indeed a whirlwind of clever ideas and rhythmic games: ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Tim Armacost: Time Being

Read "Time Being" reviewed by Roger Farbey

Tim Armacost may not be the most well-known jazz musician on the planet but he's certainly one of the best. His early life was spent in Tokyo, and Washington, then moving to Los Angeles at the age of 18. He travelled to Amsterdam and India where, in the spirit of The Beatles and John McLaughlin he assimilated much of that country's music. Finally he moved to New York in 1993 where he made his debut recording Fire. For this debut ...

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Tim Armacost: Rhythm and Transformation

Read "Tim Armacost: Rhythm and Transformation" reviewed by Matt Merewitz

Tim Armacost talks about 'choices [he] made' that determined the path he has taken as a musician. His direction was not always self-evident and its constant evolution has taken him from the US to Japan, to the Netherlands, to India, and back to the US, where has been for the past decade.

In his home base of New York, Armacost can be seen playing regularly with critically acclaimed pianist Bruce Barth, and bassist Ugonna Okegwo. In addition he ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Tim Armacost at Chris' Jazz Cafe

Read "Tim Armacost at Chris' Jazz Cafe" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Chris' Jazz Cafe Philadelphia, PA October 17, 2003

One of the biggests kicks in jazz is the discovery of fresh young talent, an artist you haven't heard yet, one who's saying something. I had that distinct pleasure in October when I heard tenor player Tim Armacost at Chris' Jazz Cafe in Philadelphia, and he tore it up.

Chris' is a pleasant intimate restaurant in The City of Brotherly Love that books a horn player who is ...

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Tim Armacost: Brightly Dark

Read "Brightly Dark" reviewed by Alexander M. Stern

The ghost of John Coltrane hovers over Brightly Dark. At times, Tim Armacost sounds startlingly like the late saxophonist, especially when he plays soprano, as he does on 'Afro Pentameter' and on the title track. Armacost is an extremely talented musician and an excellent composer, but he is still somewhat lacking in originality. Not that anyone can blame him for choosing to emulate Coltrane. In a scene from Woody Allen's Manhattan, Allen is told by an angry friend that he ...

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Tim Armacost: The Wishing Well

Read "The Wishing Well" reviewed by Joel Roberts

A quick look at his bio, and a quick listen to his accomplished new release on Double-Time Records, makes clear that 37-year-old Tim Armacost is no run-of-the-mill tenor saxophonist. A well-travelled, broadly educated New Yorker (via L.A., Washington, Tokyo, Amsterdam and India), Armacost draws heavily on the Coltrane and Rollins legacies, but has enough fresh musical ideas and sheer instrumental muscle to avoid falling into the trap of mere hero worship.

Armacost begins the proceedings here with a lush, leisurely ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Tim Armacost: The Wishing Well

Read "The Wishing Well" reviewed by AAJ Staff

In order to play true jazz, a musician needs to assimilate all that went before him, paying particular attention to those artists who charted the course and defined the vernacular for the specific instrument that he has set out to master. In music, nothing ever gets pulled out of thin air. You carry forth a linage, and hopefully along the way, through intense study and careful examination, you can extend that lineage by putting your own fingerprint on what you ...


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