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PROFILES

Duane Allman at 70: A Reflection

Read "Duane Allman at 70: A Reflection" reviewed by Alan Bryson

The actor James Dean once said, “If a man can bridge the gap between life and death, if he can live after he's died, then maybe he was a great man." James Dean is perhaps the charter member of a modern subset of such individuals who, due to modern technology, live on in the consciousness of others. They remain frozen in time--ascendant, vibrant, and youthful. When you think of James Dean, chances are you can visualize his magnetic ...

BOOK REVIEWS

Please Be With Me: A Song for My Father, Duane Allman by Galadrielle Allman

Read "Please Be With Me: A Song for My Father, Duane Allman by Galadrielle Allman" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Please Be With Me: A Song for My Father, Duane Allman Galadrielle Allman 400 Pages ISBN: # 978-1400068944 Spiegel & Grau 2014 Galadrielle Allman was two-years old when her father, Allman Brothers Band founder Duane Allman, was killed in a motorcycle accident October 29, 1971. Since that time, she has been chasing a phantom and that chase has manifested as Please Be With Me: A Song for My Father, Duane Allman. It ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective

Read "Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

If a musical note has a soul, Duane Allman could slide up to it and hold it beneath a Coricidin bottle in a tremolo seizure of sonic perfection until it screamed. Whether it is the whiplash introduction to “Don't Keep Me Wonderin'" or the most perfect electric blues performance recorded on “One Way Out," Allman had a certain radioactive intuition that translated into fire, grace and passion. Like Schubert, Allman made hay while the sun was shining, ...