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INTERVIEWS

Nat Adderley: A Player's Player

Read "Nat Adderley: A Player's Player" reviewed by Joan Gannij

This interview was originally conducted in 1997. I met Nat Adderley in jny: San Diego, California in 1986 when I was working as a disc jockey at a jazz radio station and doing the PR for La Jolla Playhouse. We did an interview about a new production of a musical being revived at the progressive La Jolla Playhouse and premiered on Broadway later that year. “Shout Up a Morning," based on the folk hero John Henry, began as ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Nat Adderley: Naturally

Read "Naturally" reviewed by Derek Taylor

Fraternal partnerships are a frequent source of creative jazz inspiration. Reference the accomplishments of Montgomery brothers (Wes, Monk and Buddy) or those of the Jones clan (Elvin, Thad and Hank) for easy examples. And then there's Wynton, Branford, Delfayo and Jason, lest we leave out the Marsalises. Family ties have a way of forging lasting musical artistry, but the hobgoblin of rivalry can also enter into the equation when one sibling's star outshines those of the others.

Nat ...

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Nat Adderley: Introducing Nat Adderley

Read "Introducing Nat Adderley" reviewed by David Rickert

The Adderley brothers were key players in the birth of hard bop, a style which grew out of the advancements of Bud Powell and other pioneers who formed a sound that many artists took to the bank for years. At this point in time Cannonball had formed his first quintet with Nat as a sideman; facing indifferent recognition, Cannonball went on to join Miles Davis and met with far greater acclaim. The two would later reunite in the second Cannonball ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Nat Adderley: Introducing Nat Adderley

Read "Introducing Nat Adderley" reviewed by David Rickert

The Adderley brothers were key players in the birth of hard bop, a style which grew out of the advancements of Bud Powell and other pioneers who formed a sound that many artists took to the bank for years. At this point in time Cannonball had formed his first quintet with Nat as a sideman; facing indifferent recognition, Cannonball went on to join Miles Davis and met with far greater acclaim. The two would later reunite in the second Cannonball ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Nat Adderley: A Little New York Midtown Music

Read "A Little New York Midtown Music" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Coming at the end of the ‘Seventies, this was a bit of a reunion. Nat and Johnny Griffin had played together on White Gardenia, Johnny’s salute to Billie Holiday. The others had played in various editions of the Cannonball band. (Victor Feldman and Ron Carter in the early ‘Sixties, Roy McCurdy later.) While the tone is light (the electric keys have a lot to do with it), the solos are heavy as the old friends make the most of this ...

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Nat Adderley: Little Big Horn!

Read "Little Big Horn!" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Not that it’s fair, but Nat Adderley will always be considered the Little Brother; he was even billed that way on an album. Tunes like “Work Song” built the funky base of the Adderley band, he used Wes Montgomery at the start of his meteoric rise, and Ellis Marsalis on a New Orleans live album Still Nat remained in the shadow, and he tried to break out in a series of albums for Riverside. This one, from 1963, gives us ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Nat Adderley: Talkin' About You

Read "Talkin' About You" reviewed by Douglas Payne

Seems like coronetist Nat Adderley (born 1931) has been around forever. But no one really started listening to him in his own right him until the unfortunate early death of his older brother in 1975. It's a true shame. Because there is ample evidence of this guy's gifts on many Cannonball records (1959-1975) and, surprisingly, nearly three dozen recordings of his own. Talkin' About You, its title a dedication to Cannonball, is a typically strong set recorded in 1990 and ...


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