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Introducing Reel to Real Records

Read "Introducing Reel to Real Records" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

As the driving force behind the Cellar Live label, saxophonist Cory Weeds has been busy doing his share to promote contemporary jazz, so it comes as a pleasant surprise that he has found the time to start the archive label Reel to Real. Unlike reissues that are sometimes lost treasures that are found again, an archive release is a found treasure that has never been heard before. Weeds has found the perfect partner in producer Zev Feldman ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Julian "Cannonball" Adderley: Swingin' In Seattle, Live At The Penthouse 1966-1967

Read "Swingin' In Seattle, Live At The Penthouse 1966-1967" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Julian “Cannonball" Adderley and his merry men--brother/cornetist Nat Adderley, bassist Victor Gaskin, backbeat king drummer Roy McCurdy and bursting-at-the-seams-with-new-ideas pianist Joe Zawinul--were having themselves a high time during 1966-67, that Renaissance time of adventure between Cecil Taylor's Unit Structures (Blue Note, 1966), Miles Smiles (Columbia, 1967) and the colorful, imagination emancipations of Sgt. Peppers' Lonely Hearts Club Band (Capital, 1967) and Charles Lloyd's live Forest Sunflower (Atlantic, 1967). Into this froth drops Cannonball's earthy and jocular soul/blues/jazz and “Mercy, Mercy, ...

RADIO

Jazz Renditions of Blues, Soul, Pop & Rock Hits (Part 1)

Read "Jazz Renditions of Blues, Soul, Pop & Rock Hits (Part 1)" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu

The compositions that we refer to as “jazz standards" were the pop songs of their time, before gradually developing into mainstays of the jazz repertoire. This week we focus on jazz interpretations of today's popular music, with renditions of the songs of artists ranging from Marvin Gaye to Sonic Youth, from Prince to Led Zeppelin, from Ray Charles to Paul Simon, from Donald Fagen to Bob Dylan and more. Will some of these songs become the standards of the coming ...

Cannonball Adderley: Somethin' Else – 1958

Read "Cannonball Adderley: Somethin' Else – 1958" reviewed by Marc Davis

Is there anything new to say about a jazz classic that features one of the greatest two-horn tandems ever to lay down a blue note? How about this: You must own this record. Period. I suspect that everyone with even a passing interest in jazz owns Miles Davis' Kind of Blue, the best-selling jazz record of all time. Well, Somethin' Else is Kind of Blue one year earlier. Same two horns--Davis on trumpet, Cannonball Adderley on alto--supported by ...

REASSESSING

Cannonball Adderley & Milt Jackson: Things Are Getting Better

Read "Cannonball Adderley & Milt Jackson: Things Are Getting Better" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Cannonball Adderley & Milt JacksonThings Are Getting BetterOJC1959/2013 Alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley's 1959 Things Are Getting Better joins guitarist Wes Montgomery's So Much Guitar!, trumpeter Chet Baker's Chet Baker Plays The Best Of Lerner & Loewe (OJC/Riverside, 1959/2013) and Gerry Mulligan's Mulligan Meets Monk (OJC/Riverside, 1957/2013) in re-issue celebrating the 60th anniversary of Riverside Records. Adderley was in much demand in the late 1950s, being part of Miles ...

FILM REVIEWS

Jazz Icons Series 3: Cannonball Adderley Live in '63

Read "Jazz Icons Series 3: Cannonball Adderley Live in '63" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Cannonball AdderleyCannonball Adderley Live in '63Jazz Icons2008

What is the greatest hard bop jazz standard? Some might argue for Bobby Timmons' “Moanin'" as performed by the composer and Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. Others may hold out for Joe Zawinul's “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" or Richard Carpenter's “Walkin'" as perfomed by Miles Davis. Still others are attached to Horace Silver's “The Preacher" while yet another group is equally adamant in its devotion ...

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Cannonball Adderley: The Cannonball Adderley Sextet in New York

Read "The Cannonball Adderley Sextet in New York" reviewed by Samuel Chell

Jazz musicians are antisocial when measured by the public's standards. Tell someone you're a musician, and the response is: “What's the name of your group?" Truth of the matter is that, the MJQ and Art Blakey notwithstanding, group identity seems an ill fit with the music's emphasis on individual expression. For this reason, it's all too easy to dismiss the dates featuring the Adderley Brothers' Group as grooving and highly communicative, but lacking in substance compared to the sessions exclusively ...

JAZZ ART

John Taylor's Jazz Caricatures: Cannonball Adderley

Read "John Taylor's Jazz Caricatures: Cannonball Adderley" reviewed by John Taylor

Cannonball Adderley About John Taylor For me, art and music flow into a creative confluence. Encouraged by my family to draw and play the drums at an early age, I continue to find expression in these art forms.Motivation for a career in art and music developed in the 1960's as I observed theme park caricaturists at work and listened to recordings of the inimitable Buddy Rich. Gifted editorial caricaturist, David Levine, ...

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Cannonball Adderley: The Cannonball Adderley Quintet In San Francisco

Read "The Cannonball Adderley Quintet In San Francisco" reviewed by Samuel Chell

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley enjoyed his greatest popularity as measured by the commercial success of Riverside releases featuring his own group with his brother Nathaniel on cornet. The sessions were frequently recorded live, including spoken introductions by the ebullient leader, presenting some “accessible" tunes, and spotlighting at least one real crowd-pleaser ("This Here," “Sack O' Woe," “Jive Samba," “Mercy Mercy, Mercy"), each later appearing as a hit single.

These sessions are ...

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Cannonball Adderley Quintet: The Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco

Read "The Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco" reviewed by David Rickert

You'd be hard pressed to find a more soulful and swinging group in 1959 than the Cannonball Adderley Quintet. Apparently lots of others thought so too, for the Jazz Workshop in San Francisco, where this live set was recorded, was standing room only, with people who couldn't get into the club lined up outside just to even faintly hear the group. Even Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich came for one night, and was as appreciative as anyone else.

What ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

The Cannonball Adderley Quintet: The Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco

Read "The Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco" reviewed by Jim Santella

Reissued as part of Concord's Keepnews Collection, this classic Riverside album has stood the test of time. Brothers Julian “Cannonball Adderley and Nat Adderley had a terrific quintet going when they hit San Francisco in 1959 for a four-week run at The Jazz Workshop. They had soul, they had rhythm, and they had blues. This is straight-ahead jazz the way we like to remember it. Cannonball Adderley expressed it best, as he spoke to his audiences about the feelings deep ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Cannonball Adderley: In New York, In Europe, Domination

Read "Cannonball Adderley: In New York, In Europe, Domination" reviewed by George Kanzler

Cannonball Adderley In New York OJC 2005 Cannonball Adderley In Europe Blue Note 2005 Cannonball Adderley Domination Blue Note 2005 Alto saxophonist Julian “Cannonball Adderley led one of the most popular groups in jazz in the early '60s. So popular, in fact, that for three-and-a-half years ...


Let Me Forget

"Let Me Forget" is from the album Lisipi and the video was taken from a live concert at the Bflat jazz club in Cagliari, Italy on January 17, 2019. The Rome-based trio consists of Liliya Akhmetzyanova on piano, Silvio Canargiu on bass, and Pierpaolo Frailis on drums.

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