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Those Who Remained Behind, Part 1

Read "Those Who Remained Behind, Part 1" reviewed by Seton Hawkins

Many Jazz artists leave South Africa for exile in the 1960s and 1970s, but many remain behind, facing horrifying working conditions and oppression. In these two episodes, we'll explore their music and their efforts to resist apartheid within South Africa. Playlist Chris McGregor and the Castle Lager Big Band “Now" from Jazz/The African Sound (Jazzman Records) 1:59 Mahotella Queens “Umkhovu" from Next Stop...Soweto (Strut Records) 9:40 Amakhosi “Easy Way" from The Best of Accordion and Sax Jives (Gallo ...

INTERVIEWS

Yakhal' Inkomo: A South African Masterpiece at Fifty

Read "Yakhal' Inkomo: A South African Masterpiece at Fifty" reviewed by Seton Hawkins

On July 23, 1968, a now-legendary recording session took place in Johannesburg, South Africa, one that would ultimately prove a defining moment in the country's Jazz history and development. Led by tenor saxophonist Winston Mankunku Ngozi, a quartet that included pianist Lionel Pillay, bassist Agrippa Magwaza, and drummer Early Mabuza would record the album Yakhal' Inkomo. Comprising two originals of Mankunku's--the title track “Yakhal' Inkomo" and “Dedication (For Daddy Trane and Brother Shorter)"--as well as John Coltrane's “Bessie's Blues" and ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Winston Mankunku Ngozi: Abantwana Be Afrika

Read "Abantwana Be Afrika" reviewed by AAJ Staff

While legions of South African jazz artists left the country in the '60s to escape apartheid, saxophonist Winston Mankunku Ngozi stayed home, and he paid a heavy price for his choice. Expatriates like Abdullah Ibrahim and Hugh Masekela circulated within American and European jazz communities, earning exposure and recognition. Mankunku labored under a regime which restricted his personal and musical freedom, sometimes performing under a psuedonym or behind a curtain. But his 1968 record Yakhal' Inkomo stands as one of ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Winston Mankunku Ngozi: Molo Africa

Read "Molo Africa" reviewed by Javier AQ Ortiz

Quick and to the Point : Burning Down the House!.

Winston Mankunku Ngozi had no blowing restrictions on this date, that’s for sure! Although there are only seven compositions in this Ngozi production, there is enough in all of the cuts to please and fill anyone’s appetite in this fantastic oeuvre that varies itself repeatedly keeping you attentive at large. Bottom line is, you must get this one.

“Khanya” has a hyphenated identity where African jazz ...


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