Articles | Popular | Future

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk: As A River

Read "As A River" reviewed by Don Phipps

Having studied with George Russell and Paul Bley, and performed with Kenny Wheeler, David Murray and Steve Swallow, there is no doubting Greg Burk's bona fides. And with As a River, Burk has fashioned a series of deeply-felt original compositions--15 in all--that would make his mentors proud. Burk's compositions are edgy and serene, bluesy and poetic, all of them demonstrating a wide range of emotions. His technique is both forceful and flowing, a difficult tandem to deploy; but ...

TAKE FIVE WITH...

Take Five With Greg Burk

Read "Take Five With Greg Burk" reviewed by Greg Burk

About Greg Burk Following his acclaimed 2016 release Clean Spring on SteepleChase Records, American pianist and composer Greg Burk returns with solo piano As A River--his 12th and most lyrical album to date. The son of classical musicians, Burk spent his formative years on the jny: Detroit jazz scene, followed by studies in jny: Boston with the likes of George Russell, Danilo Perez and Paul Bley. The lyrical, classical, side of Burk's music emerges with conviction ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk: Clean Spring

Read "Clean Spring" reviewed by Budd Kopman

Pianist Greg Burk has built quite a discography as a leader, including solo albums and his latest, Clean Spring will only further burnish his reputation as a deep player and thinker. In a very real sense, this album is a homage to Burk's mentor Paul Bley, who had an obvious impact of Burk's musical attitude and playing, but who also helped Burk pick out the tracks for the album in the months between the actual recording sessions and his death ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk Trio: The Path Here

Read "The Path Here" reviewed by Troy Collins

The Path Here, pianist Greg Burk's fifth release for the adventurous 482 Music label, finds the Rome-based American expatriate revisiting and reinterpreting some of the most engaging compositions of his youthful career, aided by old friends Jonathan Robinson (bass) and Gerald Cleaver (drums). Previously heard together with tenor saxophonist Jerry Bergonzi on Burk's 2004 quartet release Carpe Momentum (Soul Note), Robinson and Cleaver's shared history as the pianist's preferred accompanists dates back almost two decades; Burk met Robinson in 1989 ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk: Unduality

Read "Unduality" reviewed by Raul d'Gama Rose

Unduality, a duet between pianist Greg Burk and Dominican-born conguero Vicente Lebron, is quite simply the most innovative interpretation of Johann Sebastian Bach's “Invention #1" since conceived by the master. It could be one of the most striking re-imaginings of a previously composed piece, ever. In themselves, the Bach's Inventions are superlative creations demonstrating contrapuntal technique, while at the same time exploring a wide range of expressions using various styles in several keys and developing the motives in a brilliantly ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk: Many Worlds

Read "Many Worlds" reviewed by Troy Collins

A startlingly original improviser, rising pianist Greg Burk straddles a confluence of traditions, seamlessly balancing the spontaneity of free jazz with the discipline of mainstream conventions. A former Either/Orchestra member and student of Paul Bley, Yusef Lateef, George Russell and Archie Shepp, Burk possesses an uncanny gift for melody that surpasses many of his peers. On Many Worlds, Burk unveils an evocative array of pre-written tunes and collective compositions that exude a rich chiaroscuro, bolstering frenetic free improvisations with mellifluous ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk Quartet: Berlin Bright

Read "Berlin Bright" reviewed by Terrell Kent Holmes

Pianist Greg Burk embraces deconstruction and counterpoint as a player and composer, so a playful method to the madness runs through his excellent new album Berlin Bright. The opener, “Fancy Pants," exemplifies how Burk solos and writes with mild chaos in mind. After the theme the tune fractures schizophrenically, with Ignaz Dinne soaring melodically up front on alto while Burk plays a roiling counterpoint behind him. This startling, clever effect sounds like two open music sites on the Internet playing ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk: Ivy Trio

Read "Ivy Trio" reviewed by Nic Jones

It takes its time, this music. On first listen it comes on like the work merely of an accomplished piano trio that ticks all those boxes labeled with qualities such as technical accomplishment, urbanity, harmonic sophistication and the like. Further listening, however, reveals something a whole lot more worthwhile.

The spirit of Herbie Nichols stalks the ugly beauty of “Hupid Stumid and that's a cause for celebration, resonating as it does in a historical sense with Burk's belief in music ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk: Ivy Trio

Read "Ivy Trio" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

Pianist Greg Burk found the perfect ambience in a study lounge of a Harvard University dormitory to record this album. He says that the environment was as close to his childhood living room as a studio could be. Burk also reveals that he was contemplating the direction the music would take while swimming in Walden Pond. More, the music here was like sharing a bottle of wine with old friends.

Burk's approach and feelings have a ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk: Ivy Trio

Read "Ivy Trio" reviewed by John Kelman

Time can be a funny thing. Recorded prior to his last trio disc, Nothing, Knowing (482 Music, 2005), Greg Burk's Ivy Trio shares more in common than just format. Ivy Trio provides alternate views of three Burk originals--"Look to the Neutrino, “Blink to Be and “Operetta --but with a trio featuring bassist Jonathan Robinson and drummer Luther Gray in place of Nothing, Knowing's higher-profile rhythm team of bassist Steve Swallow and drummer Bob Moses. The tunes are well worth revisiting--or ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Greg Burk: The Way In

Read "The Way In" reviewed by Budd Kopman

It has been said that a jazz musician exposes his or her soul and is existentially naked when improvising in front of an audience. However, those perfect performances are rare, and most of the time they are just good. At these most common times, a player falls back onto things he has done before, maybe even the night before, and pulls it off for listeners who probably don't know the difference. Jazz musicians tend to fall into ...

PODCAST

Greg Burk: The Way In

Read "Greg Burk: The Way In" reviewed by Michael McCaw

Greg Burk The Way In 482 Music 2006

Listen

In an interview published last November by Paul Olson, pianist/composer/improviser Greg Burk revealed a very telling musical approach. In the interview Burk states that he does not view improvisation as a manner of instantaneous composition the way many people often propose. He elaborated that the key to improvisation for him “is the tension between the improviser and his or her material. So if that relationship ...