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Veryan Weston: Discoveries on Tracker Action Organs

Read "Discoveries on Tracker Action Organs" reviewed by John Eyles

This new solo album from keyboardist Veryan Weston was recorded in May 2014 on tracker action organs in seven churches located around England. The recordings here document some of the preparatory research that Weston did ahead of a tour of churches with tracker action organs. That tour involved Weston plus violinist Jon Rose and cellist Hannah Marshall, so this album should be considered a companion piece to Tuning Out (Emanem, 2015), the album recorded on the tour. As ...

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Veryan Weston / Jon Rose / Hannah Marshall: Tuning Out

Read "Tuning Out" reviewed by John Eyles

There is a very interesting project awaiting some lucky (and patient) individual, researching the role that churches played in the spread of improvised music in Britain. To clear up any ambiguity, that “churches" refers to the buildings themselves rather than their human members. Any devotee of improvised music in Britain will probably have spent far more time in church than many (so-called) devout Christians, as churches are frequently used to host gigs and also as recording spaces. That has nothing ...

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Veryan Weston: Different Tesselations

Read "Different Tesselations" reviewed by John Eyles

Different Tesselations must be considered as a companion piece to Tesselations for Luthéal Piano (Emanem 2003), the album on which Veryan Weston debuted his sequence of 52 closely linked pentatonic scales in a piece he called “Tesselations"--so named, he said, because it “contains structures which have, by coincidence, similarities with some of the principles of geometric tessellations." For the 2003 album, Weston recorded five pieces, each of which utilized from six to fourteen of the scales. He recorded the pieces ...

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Veryan Weston / Leo Svirsky / The Vociferous Choir: Different Tessellations

Read "Different Tessellations" reviewed by Raul d'Gama Rose

In the realm of tessellations--the juxtaposition of elements into a coherent pattern--the only ones that could match Different Tessellations in terms of intrigue and seduction--composed by Veryan Weston and recorded here by prodigiously talented pianist Leo Svirsky and the Vociferous Choir--is Maurits C. Escher's Circle Limit III. The Escher is visual art at its finest, a tantalizing woodcut standing in all its maddening glory, against all other two- and three-dimensional art. But even this barely compares to Weston's musical vision, ...

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Veryan Weston: Allusions

Read "Allusions" reviewed by John Eyles

With the first batch of 2009 releases--this is the first--Emanem has abandoned jewel case packaging and opted for the far more appealing all-card version, a very welcome change indeed. For years, pianist Veryan Weston has been a stalwart of the label, in a variety of contexts including duos, trios and quartets---most recently with the fine quartet Caetitu (2008).

Allusions is only Weston's second solo album for the label, the first being Tesselations for Lutheal Piano (2003). That album was an ...

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Veryan Weston/John Edwards/Mark Sanders: Gateway to Vienna

Read "Gateway to Vienna" reviewed by John Eyles

This double CD pairs a studio recording from December 2003 (the Gateway part) with a May 2002 concert recording of two long improvisations (the Vienna part). When this trio released their previous Emanem CD Mercury Concert in 1999, Veryan Weston was described as “underrated and John Edwards and Mark Sanders were described as “younger, unacclaimed players who are regulars on the London improv circuit. In the intervening years, Edwards and Sanders have advanced in acclaim, to the point where they ...

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Veryan Weston: Tessellations for Lutheal Piano (2003)

Read "Tessellations for Lutheal Piano (2003)" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Improvising pianist Veryan Weston treads cerebral territory during this adventurous undertaking, performed on the Lutheal piano. Created in 1918 by a Belgian named George Cloethens, the instrument was fabricated as a mechanism that could be installed into a grand piano. But the original instrument was presumably destroyed by fire, and so Weston trekked to the Museum of Musical Instruments in Brussels to perform on the other Lutheal piano. The keyboard Weston uses here was built in 1922 and is purportedly ...

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Veryan Weston/Caroline Kraabel: Five Shadows

Read "Five Shadows" reviewed by AAJ Staff

The aptly titled Five Shadows documents a series of piano/saxophone duets which often feature more open space than sound. Because of the relatively sparse nature of these improvisations, the notes that are played tend to acquire special meaning. Each of the five tracks on this disc represents a separate performance with its own characteristic acoustics and approach. Overall, Weston's piano playing on Five Shadows avoids conventional melody or polyphony, preferring instead to utilize light runs and trills, with interspersed punchy ...