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ALBUM REVIEWS

Anders Jormin: Poems For Orchestra

Read "Poems For Orchestra" reviewed by Friedrich Kunzmann

Swedish bassist and composer Anders Jormin has been recording since the mid 1980s, playing with greats such as his countryman Bobo Stenson, American saxophonist Charles Lloyd and Polish trumpeter Tomasz Stanko among others. Since his debut as a leader for ECM in 2001, he has kept close to the label. But the concept on Poems for Orchestra marches to somewhat of a different tune and that it is being released on the Scandinavian label Losen Records seems appropriate, considering the ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Anders Jormin / Lena Willemark / Karin Nakagawa: Trees of Light

Read "Anders Jormin / Lena Willemark / Karin Nakagawa: Trees of Light" reviewed by John Kelman

It's not often that a new recording appears on ECM from Anders Jormin--a bassist who is, perhaps, best-known for his work in fellow Swede Bobo Stenson's ongoing trio, last heard on 2012's superb Indicum (ECM), and for his tenure, alongside Stenson, in Charles Lloyd's career-defining 1990s quartets, collected recently in the Old & New Masters Edition box Quartets (ECM, 2013). But if the bassist's own projects for the label are far from frequent--his last release, 2012's Ad Lucem, and before ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Anders Jormin: Between Always And Never

Read "Between Always And Never" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Anders Jormin leads a remarkably busy life. Bassist with pianist Bobo Stenson's Trio, he has also played with the likes of saxophonists Lee Konitz, Joe Henderson, Charles Lloyd and Joe Lovano, as well as drummers Elvin Jones and Jack DeJohnette. He records under his own name, composes works for symphony orchestras, studies ethnic music in Cuba and Mozambique, teaches double bass and improvisation at Gothenburg University and writes poems in Latin. It's amazing that he finds time ...

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Anders Jormin: Ad Lucem

Read "Ad Lucem" reviewed by John Kelman

It may be frustrating when an artist releases albums infrequently, but when quality trumps quantity all is forgiven. Swedish bassist Anders Jormin's discography as a leader remains small--just eleven records as a leader since his auspicious 1988 Dragon debut, Eight Pieces. Still, with a high profile résumé sporting fellow ECM label mates such as pianist Bobo Stenson, saxophonist Charles Lloyd, trumpeters Tomasz Stańko and Don Cherry, and violinist Mark Feldman, Jormin's recorded output may be relatively diminutive, but it's consistently ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Anders Jormin / Severi Pyysalo: Aviaja

Read "Aviaja" reviewed by John Kelman

Swedish bassist Anders Jormin is familiar to anyone who followed the re-emergence of saxophonist Charles Lloyd and trumpeter Tomasz Stanko on the ECM label in the early 1990s--not to mention his longstanding relationship with pianist Bobo Stenson. But since the mid-1980s, Jormin has slowly built his own solid body of work as a leader. Prior to two ECM releases--Xeiyi (2001) and In Winds, In Light (2004), Jormin's work for the Swedish Dragon label included Jord (1995) and ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Anders Jormin: Xieyi

Read "Xieyi" reviewed by Jim Santella

Expressing his innermost thoughts through a brass choir for six selections and working a cappella for the other eleven, bassist Anders Jormin interprets classical music and introspective originals with flair on Xieyi. The album's title is a Chinese term that implies freedom of expression. Jormin takes this opportunity to express from the heart what he feels and carries with him. They're songs from folklore, songs from known composers, and songs from Jormin's expressive pen.

As he interprets traditional ...

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Anders Jormin: Xieyi

Read "Xieyi" reviewed by Bev Stapleton

I first listened to Xieyi hard on the heels of a Grant Green Blue Note record from the early '60s. In some respects those two discs could act as markers for the vast range of music that we call “jazz" today. Where Green's music is fast-moving, blues-drenched, and driven by infectious grooves, Anders Jormin's describes small movements in a still world.

Jormin is best known for his translucent bass playing with Bobo Stenson, Tomas Stanko, and Charles Lloyd. His previous ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Anders Jormin: Xieyi

Read "Xieyi" reviewed by John Kelman

Recorded at the turn of the century and released in Europe in 2001, Swedish bassist Anders Jormin's first release as a leader on ECM is only now being issued in North America. It's easy to suspect that the reason for the delay is to trade in on the greater cachet of pianist Bobo Stenson, with whom Jormin has worked for twenty years and who has his own new release, the sublime Goodbye. But the truth is that the release of ...

INTERVIEWS

Anders Jormin: Touching the Heart and Spirit

Read "Anders Jormin: Touching the Heart and Spirit" reviewed by John Kelman

Swedish bassist, compser, bandleader and educator Anders Jormin may be best known to North American audiences as a member of Charles Lloyd's and Tomasz Stanko's mid-'90s ECM label quartets along with pianist Bobo Stenson. He's also been a longstanding participant in Stenson's own trio, with three sublime recordings released on ECM since '96 including the subtle yet substantive double-disk set, Serenity. But the truth of the matter is that Jormin has been forging his own career since the mid-'80s, first ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Anders Jormin: In Winds, In Light

Read "In Winds, In Light" reviewed by John Kelman

While those familiar with bassist Anders Jormin's recorded work on the ECM label with Tomasz Stanko, Charles Lloyd and Bobo Stenson will think of him as clearly jazz-centric, albeit adventurously so, the truth that emerges from his numerous recordings on the Swedish Dragon label is that of an intensely personal artist, whose vision places no boundaries on his muse. His first release as a leader on ECM, ”01's Xeiyi , which alternated deeply lyrical solo bass pieces with moving works ...