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James Silberstein: Expresslane

Read "Expresslane" reviewed by Michael P. Gladstone

It's unclear why a guitar-featured album with a bunch of solid horn players on hand engenders feelings of nervousness--especially when they are pros like tenor saxophonist Eric Alexander, trumpeter Jim Rotundi and trombonist Steve Davis. From the opening bars of Cole Porter's “From This Moment On," on James Silberstein's Expresslane, horn riffs are heard alongside guitar chords and runs.

It is obvious, though, that Silberstein is quite comfortable in this setting and enjoys sharing the spotlight with his ...

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James Silberstein: Express Lane

Read "Express Lane" reviewed by Woodrow Wilkins

The way “From This Moment On begins, you might think you're in store for some high-spirited big band jazz. However, the small horn ensemble make up just part of the support for guitarist James Silberstein's Express Lane. A fixture on the New York jazz scene, Silberstein has a long list of distinguished artists with whom he has associated. Among them are Zoot Sims, Norah Jones, Jack Wilkins and the Larry Elgart Orchestra. Silberstein's debut CD, Song for Micaela ...

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James Silberstein: Express Lane

Read "Express Lane" reviewed by Alain Londes

Composer/songwriter Cole Porter's “From This Moment On" fires up talented guitarist James Silberstein's second album, Express Lane. The up-tempo rendition of this classic brings in a full and dynamic band for this project, including topnotch members of the well-known New York-based collective, One For All: trumpeter Jim Rotondi, tenor saxophonist Eric Alexander and saxophonist Steve Davis. Silberstein plays with a virtuosity reminiscent of Joe Pass, Pat Martino, and Martin Taylor. Whether in a trio, quartet, or larger ...

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James Silberstein: Express Lane

Read "Express Lane" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Even though he is heard prominently throughout, James Silberstein's second recording as leader isn't a “guitar album" as such but more an ensemble piece, as it features on several tracks a number of first-class instrumentalists from the New York area, namely trumpeter Jim Rotondi, tenor saxophonist Eric Alexander, trombonist Steve Davis and flautist Anne Drummond.

Silberstein is showcased with his rhythm section (pianist Jill McCarron, bassist Harvie S, drummer Vince Cherico) on his own “Express Lane," adding percussionist Daniel Sadownick ...

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James Silberstein: Express Lane

Read "Express Lane" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Composer/guitarist James Silberstein embarks on a musical commute through the non-stop highway of jazz on his very own Express Lane, driving eleven terrific charts of contemporary and Latin jazz grooves making for one burner of an album. This represents the artist's second release and follow-up to his debut, Song For Micaela (Consolidated Artists Production, 2004).

For this recording, Silberstein brings back saxophonist Eric Alexander, bassist Harvie S and drummer Vince Cherico. Trumpeter Jim Rotondi replaces the great Randy ...

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James Silberstein: Song For Micaela

Read "Song For Micaela" reviewed by Jim Santella

With his recording debut, guitarist James Silberstein reveals a warm tone and crisp articulation. His straight-ahead session captures the essence of bebop, as he and his guests explore the art of improvisation over a theme. Several originals add favorably to the session's appeal.

With Randy Brecker, Eric Alexander and Carla Cook alongside, the guitarist weaves creative threads. He shows a penchant for up-tempo frenzy and blazing fast motion. Bruce Barth contributes several exciting piano romps. His feature on ...

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James Silberstein: Song For Micaela

Read "Song For Micaela" reviewed by John Kelman

By all accounts guitarist James Silberstein has been a busy working musician on the Georgia, Miami and New York scenes for 25 years, but has operated mainly beneath the radar, only now releasing his debut CD, Song For Micaela, which finds him mining the juncture between post bop modernists like Pat Martino and more staid traditionalists like Tal Farlow. With a programme that combines some well-heeled standards with a number of interesting originals whose main purpose is to create an ...


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