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Daily articles carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. Read our popular and future articles.

ALBUM REVIEW

Leslie Pintchik: You Eat My Food, You Drink My Wine, You Steal My Girl!

Read "You Eat My Food, You Drink My Wine, You Steal My Girl!" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

On this, her sixth album, pianist Leslie Pintchik shows that she can compose distinctive melodies. All of the original compositions she does on this CD are bright and memorable and even the two standards she covers are given surprising arrangements.She establishes herself from the beginning with the uniquely-titled “You Eat My Food." This turns out to be a nice piece of surging jazz-funk in the manner of early Herbie Hancock with a serpentine piano line and pithy accents ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Leslie Pintchik: You Eat My Food, You Drink My Wine, You Steal My Girl!

Read "You Eat My Food, You Drink My Wine, You Steal My Girl!" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

If they gave out awards for album titles, this one would surely be in the running for top honors. “You eat my food, you drink my wine, you steal my girl" is a harsh and odd phrase that rolls off the tongue like some sort of backwoods country accusation-turned-lament, but its origins are far more urban in nature. While crossing a street in lower Manhattan, pianist Leslie Pintchik heard a nearby voice yell said curious and angry statement. Not one ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Leslie Pintchik: True North

Read "True North" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Leslie Pintchik's music has a magical draw to it. Perhaps it has to do with her pearly and softly pronounced piano work, at once circuitous and direct in the way it shapes and navigates expressive pathways. Or maybe it has to do with her compositional acumen. Her pieces, after all, have a way of registering and resonating both with the pleasure center of the brain and the heart. Those are the most admirable qualities connected to Pintchik's art, and they ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Leslie Pintchik: In the Nature of Things

Read "In the Nature of Things" reviewed by Dr. Judith Schlesinger

Leslie Pintchik begins her explorations on her fourth CD with a musical sunrise of soft, shimmering colors that grows into a bright and energetic day. From this appealing opener, “With You in Mind," she instantly distinguishes herself from the legions of jazz composers who confuse “personal expression" with self-indulgent noodling that shows little concern for story or melody. In contrast, Pintchik composes memorable tunes that tell a coherent tale: here, the story is usually light-spirited and swinging, with flashes of ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Leslie Pintchik: In the Nature of Things

Read "In the Nature of Things" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Pianist Leslie Pintchik takes advantage her her New York home base on her recordings by enlisting some of the city's most innovative musicians to help her share her vision. On previous three CD releases Pintchik has sculpted a seductive sound that combines the cerebral with engaging and beautiful, much in the mode of piano legend Herbie Hancock. And here, on her In the Nature of Things she treads softly on more of a Hancock influence, that of his exceptional 1968 ...

INTERVIEW

Leslie Pintchik: Two Different Kinds of Art

Read "Leslie Pintchik: Two Different Kinds of Art" reviewed by Bruce Lindsay

The title of Leslie Pintchik's third album, We're Here To Listen (Pintch Hard Records, 2010), says much about the pianist and composer's musical philosophy. She recognizes the importance of technical skill, but she also values instinct, the open mind and the dismissal of boundaries between musical genres. It's an approach that Pintchik emphasizes throughout this interview, conducted by phone from her New York home. It's also readily identifiable in her writing, her playing and her selection of songs by other ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Leslie Pintchik: We're Here To Listen

Read "We're Here To Listen" reviewed by Jeff Dayton-Johnson

Pianist Leslie Pintchik's Quartets (Ambient , 2007) featured two innovations on the piano trio format. On half the tracks, the basic trio of Pintchik, bassist Scott Hardy and drummer Mark Dodge, was joined by saxophonist Steve Wilson, and on the other half by percussionist Satoshi Takeishi. The saxophone being what it is, the Wilson tracks tended to stand out. But the Takeishi tracks have arguably held more lasting interest. This is, after all, the instrumentation chosen by Herbie Hancock on ...


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