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ALBUM REVIEWS

Bruce Hornsby: Absolute Zero

Read "Absolute Zero" reviewed by Geno Thackara

While the music world has plenty of explorers, Bruce Hornsby is still one of its most restless Marco Polos. Where he's often made a habit of bouncing from one thing to another for a whole album at a time--solo contemporary piano, yee-haw bluegrass, piano-less folk, jazz trio, film score and stage musical--he's in full, glorious, kitchen-sink mode this time around. Don't read too much into the title. Absolute Zero gleefully zips all over the style map with the exact opposite ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Bruce Hornsby & The Noisemakers with Los Lobos At The Flynn Center for the Performing arts

Read "Bruce Hornsby & The Noisemakers with Los Lobos At The Flynn Center for the Performing arts" reviewed by Doug Collette

Bruce Hornsby & The Noisemakers w/ Los Lobos Flynn Center for the Performing Arts Burlington, Vermont July 20, 2018 Given the musicianly approach Bruce Hornsby has applied to his career, it makes perfect sense for him to tour with Los Lobos. With his bands (originally the Range and now the Noisemakers) and in collaborations with like like-minded artists such as the Grateful Dead, Bela Fleck and Pat Metheny, the keyboardist/vocalist/composer has put more premium on ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers: Rehab Reunion

Read "Rehab Reunion" reviewed by Geno Thackara

A Bruce Hornsby album with no piano sounds sort of like a Chinese dinner without rice. Well, upon further consideration it may not be quite as crazy as it sounds. The man's career is defined by nothing if not restlessness, and he's managed to do something fresh and different almost every time out. The most surprising thing he could do would be to not surprise us somehow. Rehab Reunion shows that that danger is as remote as ever. ...

INTERVIEWS

Bruce Hornsby: The Master of Levitation

Read "Bruce Hornsby: The Master of Levitation" reviewed by Mark F. Turner

For more than 20 years, singer/songwriter, pianist/composer, and band-leader Bruce Hornsby, has proven to be a survivor in an ever changing music environment. From winning multiple awards including a Grammy for Best New Artist in 1987 for the multi-platinum album The Way It Is (RCA, 1986) with his band The Range, to dual releases in 2007 (on Sony/Legacy)--a foot-stomping bluegrass duo Ricky Skaggs & Bruce Hornsby and the swinging jazz trio outing Camp Meeting, with drummer Jack DeJohnette and bassist ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers: Levitate

Read "Levitate" reviewed by Mark F. Turner

It is an oxymoronic but accurate statement that would describe Bruce Hornsby as a contemporary traditionalist. Traditionalist in the sense that his music is steeped in the heartland of America--a riverboat pianism with not only the blues, but also jazz and pop; a storyteller whose song vignettes portray the everyday lives of ordinary folk as heard in his many releases beginning with the multi-million selling debut album, The Way It Is (RCA, 1986). Yet he is a contemporary who is ...

MUSIC AND THE CREATIVE SPIRIT

Bruce Hornsby: Halcyon Days

Read "Bruce Hornsby: Halcyon Days" reviewed by Lloyd N. Peterson Jr.

If Bill Evans would have grown up in the Deep South influenced by the gospel hymns of the Southern Baptist church, he just may have sounded like Bruce Hornsby. That would probably be a fair description considering that Hornsby knows no boundaries and often travels into the genres of pop, folk, jazz, classical, bluegrass and whatever else might inspire him. And though it's an approach that would never inspire record company executives, Hornsby has never catered to the whims of ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bruce Hornsby: Camp Meeting

Read "Camp Meeting" reviewed by Troy Collins

Camp Meeting, pianist Bruce Hornsby's high profile jazz trio session with heavyweight bassist Christian McBride and iconic drummer Jack DeJohnette, may seem to have materialized out of thin air, but don't you believe them. Hornsby has been gradually building to this statement his whole career.

Last year's retrospective boxed set, Intersections (RCA), revealed the varied interests of a musician who has long charted his own path. As a touring member of the Grateful Dead and regular collaborator with ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bruce Hornsby: Camp Meeting

Read "Camp Meeting" reviewed by Mark F. Turner

The funny thing about roots is that you don't know how they really look until you shake loose all of the dirt. Who knew that the “popular music" pianist/songwriter/singer, Bruce Hornsby, was a jazz musician at heart? Many may recall the Grammy Award winning artist from his 1986 platinum hit and album of the same title The Way It Is (RCA), marked by new folk sounds, social consciousness lyrics, and unorthodox yet glowing piano playing. Hornsby has sinced crossed the ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Bruce Hornsby: Intersections [1985-2005]

Read "Bruce Hornsby: Intersections [1985-2005]" reviewed by John Kelman

Bruce Hornsby Intersections [1985-2005] Legacy Recordings 2006

One often wonders what path an artist might have taken had he or she made different creative choices. While it would be presumptuous to compare the two in terms of sheer impact, it's certainly a possibility that had Keith Jarrett chosen to pursue a career as a pop singer/songwriter he may well have sounded like Bruce Hornsby. Certainly Hornsby's debt to Jarrett is acknowledged and self-evident, even ...