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Ingrid and Christine Jensen: Infinitude

Read "Infinitude" reviewed by John Kelman

While they've often recorded together over the years--from the collective Nordic Connect quintet and trumpeter Ingrid Jensen's early albums including Now as Then (Justin Time, 2003), to many of saxophonist Christine's recordings, from her two much-lauded Jazz Orchestra albums (most recently Habitat (Justin Time, 2014)) to earlier, small group dates including Look Left (Effendi, 2006)--the two Jensen sisters (separated by four years) have never recorded an album collaboratively, with both names sharing the marquee equally...until now. While sharing has never ...

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Christine Jensen: Infinitude

Read "Infinitude" reviewed by Roger Farbey

On paper and with this line-up you might be forgiven for regarding this as a new version of the Brecker Brothers with the two West Canadian Ingrid Jensen and Montreal-based sister Christine taking the roles respectively of Randy Brecker and the sorely missed Michael. But this would be a mistake. The Jensens have carved out their own distinct sound and having worked in big band and smaller ensembles with such luminaries as Clark Terry, Maria Schneider and Terri Lyne Carrington, ...

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Christine Jensen/Maggi Olin: Transatlantic Conversations: 11 Piece Band Live

Read "Transatlantic Conversations: 11 Piece Band Live" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

The engaging and inventive Transatlantic Conversations: 11 Piece Band is the result of a remarkable collaboration between Swedish pianist Maggie Olin and Canadian saxophonist Christine Jensen. What is exceptional about this Olin/Jensen pairing is the complementary nature of their singular musical visions. This is reflected in shared thematic structure and the creative spirit of the originals each woman has penned without either one losing her stylistic distinctiveness. The Elingtonian “Orange" is one of the five Olin compositions on ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra: Habitat

Read "Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra: Habitat" reviewed by John Kelman

It may have been the title of her last album--Treelines, Christine Jensen's first large ensemble recording--but there was no song of that name on the 2010 Justin Time release. Instead, it's the lead-off to Habitat, Jensen's second album with her Jazz Orchestra, a commissioned work for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Jazz Orchestra, its director, Dr. Paul Haar, looking for the Canadian saxophonist/composer to continue the strong work begun on Treelines. And why not? Treelines may have been the Montreal, Canada-based ...

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Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra: Habitat

Read "Habitat" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Christine Jensen is one of the new breed of composer / arrangers who write for large ensembles on a grand scale, favoring themes that paint well-drawn pictures and tell evocative stories, most of which are based on personal experiences or particular sights or sounds that have lingered in their mind and led them to put pen to paper (metaphorically speaking, of course, as most musicians these days use computers like the rest of us). Jensen, a Canadian, ...

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Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra: Habitat

Read "Habitat" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

The blurry photo that adorns the cover of Habitat is completely at odds with what awaits inside the package: Some of the most incredibly focused and finely wrought large ensemble music to emerge in recent memory. Canadian saxophonist/composer Christine Jensen won plenty of fans with the her last jazz orchestra album--Treelines (Justin Time Records, 2011)--but this one puts her in an entirely different category. With Habitat, Jensen joins the ranks of the large ensemble elite.

INTERVIEWS

Christine Jensen: Impressionism

Read "Christine Jensen: Impressionism" reviewed by George Colligan

[ Editor's Note: The following interview is reprinted from George Colligan's blog, Jazztruth] I was first exposed to alto saxophonist Christine Jensen through working with her trumpet playing sister Ingrid Jensen. We played some of her music, which really struck me as direct, mature, grounded and highly creative. Later on I got to meet her; unfortunately, we have not played together much (except for maybe one or two jam sessions years ago). I hope that will be rectified ...

INTERVIEWS

Christine Jensen: Looking Left

Read "Christine Jensen: Looking Left" reviewed by Jason Crane

The Globe and Mail called saxophonist and composer Christine Jensen “one of the most important Canadian composers of her generation." She grew up with her trumpet-playing sister Ingrid near Vancouver, though she's now based in Montreal. Jensen has recorded three albums. Her most recent project is Look Left (Effendi, 2006), the result of a half-year spent studying and writing in Paris.

AAJ contributor Jason Crane caught up with Jensen to talk about life along the Seine, ...

PODCAST
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Christine Jensen: Look Left

Read "Look Left" reviewed by John Kelman

While Christine Jensen remains one of Canada's best kept secrets, she has garnered some international attention since emerging on the scene in the mid-1990s. Three of her compositions were featured on the highly regarded Vernal Fields (Enja, 1994), by her sister, trumpeter Ingrid Jensen, and she's had works for big band recorded and performed the world over. Still, outside Canada she remains a relatively unknown quantity in the grander scheme of things, something that Look Left deserves to rectify.

Jensen ...

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Christine Jensen: A Shorter Distance

Read "A Shorter Distance" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

Christine Jensen's maturity is in quick evidence on this album. Not only does she show great skills as a writer, but her arrangements fill her tunes with a pulsating body and show a keen mind for color and layered textures. She presents compositions for quintet, sextet and septet settings, giving each one character and fulfillment.

Jensen does not bow to the popular or the mundane in her writing. Each song is complex and crafted to bring out the ...

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Christine Jensen: Collage

Read "Collage" reviewed by Steve Armour

Christine Jensen starts Collage with a blues in fancy wrapping: a funky Rhodes ostinato, a displaced, sliding tonal center, and a stutter-step orchestration. This rich writing asks and gets the most from Jensen's musicians on this, her debut recording.

Drummer Karl Jannuska and pianist Brad Turner chat it up throughout the album. Their open phrasing on “Sweet Adelphi" and “Half Tide" lets the soloists breathe--lets them say something, then rest. Turner leads while Jannuska adds sweeteners and asides: an extra ...