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ALBUM REVIEWS

Trey Gunn / Marco Minnemann: Modulator

Read "Modulator" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Touch guitar ace Trey Gunn composed this album based upon Marco Minnemann's 51-minute Normalizer 2 drum solo. Thankfully, this is not a bash fest; instead, the drummer's rhythmic foray features odd-metered polyrhythmic episodes and textural cymbal swashes amid a cavalcade of salient percussive concepts.The preponderance of the largely, contiguous tracks do indeed pronounce a modulating framework; on “Flood," the duo exercises restraint to complement the sinuous journey. Gunn's limber touch guitar work encompasses fretless guitar and basses to ...

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KTU: Quiver

Read "Quiver" reviewed by John Kelman

There's often considerable difference between live and studio recording, where the facility's greater capacity for control and manipulation can almost become an additional band member. Still, for some the difference is a subtle one. In the case of KTU--a collective that began with half of King Crimson (Warr guitarist Trey Gunn and traps/button man Pat Mastelotto) working together as TU, accordionist Kimo Pohjonen and sampler Samuli Kosminen (both Finns)--there's a world of a difference. The group's debut, 8 Armed Monkey ...

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Quodia: The Arrow: A Story in Seven Parts

Read "The Arrow: A Story in Seven Parts" reviewed by John Kelman

Transferring live multi-media projects to CD and/or DVD can represent a significant and often insurmountable challenge. Quodia--ex-King Crimson touch guitarist Trey Gunn and experimental keyboardist/founder of avante-popsters Rise Robots Rise (with Joe Mendelson)--clearly views recorded media as a distinct entity, but one that can work independently and in conjunction with live performance. The Arrow: A Story in Seven Parts is a modern parable blended with music that's both structured and open to improvisation. Live, it's a concert experience, a film ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

The Trey Gunn Band: The Joy of Molybdenum

Read "The Joy of Molybdenum" reviewed by Michael Askounes

Robert Fripp disciple Trey Gunn has taken some time out from his King Crimson day job to produce his new release, the strangely titled The Joy of Molybdenum. The album relies heavily on Gunn's groundbreaking work on 8, 10, and 12 string touch guitars, and also features guitarist Tony Geballe and percussionist Bob Muller. Upon first listen, you will SWEAR that you've found a lost King Crimson disc or are listening to another one of Fripp's “ProjeKcts; however, upon further ...