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Ken Fowser: Don't Look Down

Read "Don't Look Down" reviewed by Paul Rauch

Ken Fowser arrived in New York City in 2005 after being raised in the rhythmic legacy of the Philly sound. Playing with a deep harmonic sensibility, often sidestepping traditional harmony, Fowser has since created a sound that bears the pure physicality of the Philadelphia tradition refined by his experience in Gotham. His sound conjures audible images of George Coleman, as much as Philly legends Benny Golson and Jimmy Heath. His creative drive inspired by these pure jazz legacies has been ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Ken Fowser: Now Hear This!

Read "Now Hear This!" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Taking a cue from some of the other smaller jazz-based labels, Posi-Tone has done a remarkable job over the past few years of building a roster of budding talents worthy of wider recognition. Part of the allure of such an endeavor is the ability to see the evolution of an artist's muse unfolding like a rose. Those in the know have heard from tenor saxophonist Ken Fowser through his partnership with vibraphonist Behn Gillece via the four albums the two ...

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Ken Fowser/Behn Gillece: Top Shelf

Read "Top Shelf" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

The team of tenor saxophonist Ken Fowser and vibraphonist Behn Gillece has been steadily releasing music of a similar nature on the Posi-Tone label since its 2009 debut, Full View, hit the shelves. With this, the duo's fourth album, Fowser and Gillece continue along the same path with nary a stylistic sharp turn, yet this one manages to stand out because of one important difference: a third man out front. The three previous recordings were leaders-and-rhythm dates but, with Top ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Ken Fowser and Behn Gillece: Duotone

Read "Duotone" reviewed by Bruce Lindsay

The tenor and vibes partnership of Ken Fowser and Behn Gillece has already established its credentials as an imaginative and innovative creator of cool-swinging straight-ahead jazz. Duotone, the duo's third album, reinforces those credentials with a fresh set of original tunes. As with their previous Posi-Tone releases--Full View (2009) and Little Echo (2010)--Duotone is a quintet recording. Each albums features a different rhythm section, and whether this is a deliberate strategy or not, it gives them variation ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Ken Fowser / Behn Gillece: Duotone

Read "Duotone" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

"Duotone" is a term that belongs to the world of photography, but it makes perfect sense when applied to this recording. Tenor saxophonist Ken Fowser and vibraphonist Behn Gillece superimpose their tonal colors and personalities against one another, to create an aural portrait that's both traditional and modern. While the supporting personnel have changed on each of their three Posi-Tone dates, the basic template by which their music is designed remains, essentially, the same. On each album, ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Ken Fowser & Behn Gillece: Little Echo

Read "Little Echo" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Tenor saxophone and vibraphone frontlines--while not as commonplace as two horn teams--have their place in history. Lionel Hampton and Stan Getz had a marvelous meeting in the studio and Milt Jackson recorded with Sonny Rollins, Coleman Hawkins and John Coltrane, on different occasions. Bobby Hutcherson added to this legacy, working with Dexter Gordon and maintaining a fruitful partnership with Harold Land, and now tenor saxophonist Ken Fowser and vibraphonist Behn Gillece are furthering this legacy. Little Echo ...


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