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Victor Prieto: The Three Voices

Read "The Three Voices" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

On the cover of his CD The Three Voices, Victor Prieto looks as if he's going to do something crazy with his accordions. He is a giant behind the big city skyline, towering over tall buildings. It's sort of like a “Godzilla of the squeeze boxes" scene. But the accordionist doesn't look like he's bent on Godzillian destruction; he, in fact, looks as if his intention is the spreading of musical joy. Prieto is New York City-based now--he ...

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Chris Cheek / Victor Prieto: Rollo Coaster

Read "Rollo Coaster" reviewed by Martin Gladu

Chances are you have never heard the accordion played the way Victor Prieto plays it. Indeed, much like Toots Thielemans established the harmonica in the jazz lore huffing and puffing bop lines through his teeth, Prieto breaks the glass ceiling hovering above the crown of Cyrillus Demian's patented invention, squeezing improvised airs with a technical assurance that deserves more widespread recognition.Long known for catapulting the French valse musette, the Bohemian polka, the French-Canadian reels, and the festive music ...

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Victor Prieto: Persistencia

Read "Persistencia" reviewed by Marcia Hillman

On Victor Prieto's debut recording, the accomplished Spanish accordionist has chosen to approach his instrument in a new way. Aided by bassist Carlo DeRosa and drummer Allison Miller, Prieto included Egberto Gismonti's “Frevo, John Coltrane's “26-2 and Astor Piazzolla's “Libertango in a program with six original compositions. Starting with “Frevo, Prieto immediately dazzles with his fast fingering, switching from single notes to chords in rapid fashion. The group is equally at home playing the up-tempo material (like ...

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Victor Prieto: Persistencia

Read "Persistencia" reviewed by Tom Greenland

Originally from Orense, Spain, accordionist Victor Prieto brings old-world charm and a new-fangled approach to jazz. Prieto's debut CD release, Persistencia, featuring Carlo DeRosa on acoustic bass and Allison Miller on trap drums, showcases the leader's unique approach to harmony, melody, and tone, effectively translating the accordionist's unique jazz sensibility via an unusual instrumental vehicle.

The accordion's distinctive timbre often conjures up associations with Polish polka, German folk lieder, Viennese waltzes, French musette & cabaret chansons, North American Tex-Mex, Louisiana ...

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Victor Prieto: Persistencia

Read "Persistencia" reviewed by William Grim

Spanish-born jazz accordionist Victor Prieto is the most exciting such player to come on the scene since Eddie Monteiro. Melding Argentine and Brazilian influences with a bop sensibility, Prieto gives the lie to all of the nasty things that have been said over the years about the much-maligned squeezebox.

Backed by Rachel Z drummer Allison Miller and the extraordinarily gifted bassist Carlo DeRosa, Prieto presents a varied and virtuosic set of performances on Persistencia. The variety of tunes ...

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Victor Prieto: Persistencia

Read "Persistencia" reviewed by Budd Kopman

Trios are sensitive things. They take a jump in the complexity from duos, yet can't be split into rhythm and lead instruments like quartets. To create a cohesive sound, all the members of the trio must be listening carefully to the overall balance. Each can essentially be a soloist at a different level. The trio that accordionist Victor Prieto leads on Persistencia is very finely tuned and highly responsive. Prieto plays accordion the way Toots Thielmans plays ...

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Victor Prieto: Persistencia

Read "Persistencia" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

The accordion seems to be gaining favor in the jazz world--just think of Gary Versace's beautiful playing on the title cut of Maria Schneider's masterpiece, Concert in the Garden, in an orchestral setting. Victor Prieto goes with a pared-down approach on Persistencia, placing the squeezebox out in front of bass (Carlo DeRosa) and drums (Allison Miller).Originally from Galicia, Spain, the New York-based Prieto offers up his own personal vision of accordion playing with Persistencia. It's a sweet sound, ...

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Victor Prieto: Persistencia

Read "Persistencia" reviewed by Mark F. Turner

There is a strange beauty in the accordion, a most unusual musical instrument. From polka to tango, the accordion has a sound that is instantly recognizable. It has surfaced more in popular music and jazz-influenced recordings, like Richard Galliano's Ruby, My Dear (Dreyfus, 2005). Victor Prieto now makes a most compelling case for the accordion as a primary jazz instrument on Persistencia. Born in Spain and now living in New York, Prieto, who has extensive academic studies ...

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Victor Prieto: Persistencia

Read "Persistencia" reviewed by Michael P. Gladstone

The resurgence of the accordion during the past decade, in jazz in particular, seems almost to rival the instrument's popularity during the 1950s, with mainstream artists like Art Van Damme and Angelo Di Pippo actually selling records. In the post-Millennium era, that torch is being kept alive by France's Richard Galliano, who has shown his affinity for bebop and the occasional tango in a jazz setting on his many Dreyfus Jazz albums--and, of course, the influential tango work of Astor ...


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