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Plucky Strum: Departure

Read "Departure" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Guitarist Sheryl Bailey and bassist Harvie S have clearly learned the first rule of getting ahead in show biz in these days of glitz and hype: find a clever and distinctive name--in this case Plucky Strum (after all, Lady Gaga was going nowhere as Stephani Germanotta). Departure is the duo's second album under that name for Whaling City Sound, one on which they show that pluck or strum by any name can be charming and persuasive. Musically ...

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The Sheryl Bailey 4: For All Those Living

Read "For All Those Living" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Wes Montgomery may be gone, but the great jazz guitarist's crisp, rich-toned sound lives on in Sheryl Bailey, whose style is so reminiscent of the icon, but whose technique has also been compared to that of Pat Martino. It is quite clear that Bailey is a gifted guitarist as well as a veteran musician, with several albums to her credit. Bailey has performed in many formats throughout her career, yet For All Those Living, is her first to lead a ...

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Sheryl Bailey: For All Those Living

Read "For All Those Living" reviewed by Nic Jones

In the past, guitarist Sheryl Bailey has been an embodiment of versatility through her work with bassist Richard Bona, and with David Krakauer's klezmer ensemble. She now has another strain of music in her bag with this program of straight-ahead jazz guitar. Both Pat Martino and Wes Montgomery can be cited as reference points for this outing, but the fact remains that Bailey brings her own not inconsiderable character to bear. The featured quartet is Bailey's current working group, and ...

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Sheryl Bailey 4: For All Those Living

Read "For All Those Living" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

While guitarist Sheryl Bailey's A New Promise was a tribute to another tremendously talented female guitarist--the late Emily Remler--For All Those Living touches on a wide variety of figures, both here and gone. Bailey's music pays direct tribute to fellow guitarists, like Jack Wilkins ("Wilkinsburg"), Masa Sasaki ("Masa's Bag") and the late Jimmy Wyble, but she also looks beyond her own instrument with an homage to the great Hank Mobley, the man that jazz critic Leonard Feather dubbed “the middleweight ...

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Sheryl Bailey 4: For All Those Living

Read "For All Those Living" reviewed by Greg Simmons

Sheryl Bailey 4's For All Those Living has a nice, balanced feel to it, with a lively, up-tempo pace that never becomes frenetic. It's finely played, and rewards serious listening, but none of the musicians are overly showy.The quartet plays as much with Bailey's guitar work as behind it, and is clearly sympathetic to its performers. Already highly respected--and perhaps because of it--Bailey plays with the self-confidence of a guitarist who's surpassed the point of seeking validation through ...

INTERVIEWS

Sheryl Bailey: Homecoming

Read "Sheryl Bailey: Homecoming" reviewed by Matthew Warnock

Sheryl Bailey has been rising to the top of the jazz guitar world ever since she burst onto the national scene by taking third place in the 1996 Thelonious Monk Guitar Competition. Following her top three finish in the competition, and graduating from the prestigious Berklee College of Music, Bailey has released five albums as a bandleader, a DVD and two instructional books, all while maintaining a seemingly constant touring schedule and holding down an associate professorship at ...

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Sheryl Bailey: A New Promise

Read "A New Promise" reviewed by Mark F. Turner

A New Promise by Sheryl Bailey is an outstanding work from a guitarist (and a rare release from a female jazz guitarist) who can run with the big dogs, in this case a big band ensemble. While her confident and stylish chops might suggest the phraseology of Kenny Burrell or Pat Metheny, she has a unique voice which is probably more closely influenced by forerunner guitarist Emily Remler, to whom Bailey dedicates this release. This is a ...

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The Sheryl Bailey 3: Live @ The Fat Cat

Read "Live @ The Fat Cat" reviewed by Budd Kopman

Live @ The Fat Cat is an intensely burning live recording which documents two gigs from November of 2005. Sporting killer chops along a natural talent for building a solo, Sheryl Bailey is a joy to listen to. But the pleasure does not stop there, as organist Gary Versace (who played on Loren Stillman's It Could Be Anything) and drummer Ian Froman (from the Murley/Braid Quartet's Mnemosyne's March) match her every step of the way. The trio's members have been ...

LIVE REVIEWS

The Sheryl Bailey 3: Bull's Eye

Read "The Sheryl Bailey 3: Bull's Eye" reviewed by Elliott Simon

The patchwork Oriental rug decor and comfortable living room ambiance at NYC's Fat Cat immediately put both musician and audience on intimate terms. Within that friendly context, guitarist Sheryl Bailey's Hammond B3 trio highlighted newly composed material from their latest CD, Bull's Eye. Bailey's intricately elegant chordal improvisations and blisteringly precise leads were willing and equal partner to the power and versatility of organ master Gary Versace. Ian Froman's inventive and propulsive drumming not only added a distinctive third voice ...

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Sheryl Bailey: The Power of 3

Read "The Power of 3" reviewed by Elliott Simon

Guitarist Sheryl Bailey is chameleon-like in her ability to bring inventive coloration to traditional forms. She has released a sizzling guitar goddess CD, Little Misunderstood; a bluesy dual guitar follow-up, Reunion of Souls; and adds highly original stylings to David Krakauer's Klezmer Madness. Her latest recording, The Power of 3, further broadens this diversity by featuring nine new Bailey originals in the context of a traditional Hammond B-3 organ trio. The one constant in all this variety is one hell ...

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Sheryl Bailey & Chris Bergson: Reunion Of Souls

Read "Reunion Of Souls" reviewed by Jim Santella

A duo guitar session allows you to soak up the rays from several sources at the same time. Naturally, each has a style and technique somewhat different from the other. More to the point, however, is what Sheryl Bailey and Chris Bergson are doing, as they communicate with the audience, with the band, and with each other. Like the city where both live and work, this session is full of contrasts. When one guitarist swings slow and comfortable, the other ...

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Sheryl Bailey: Little Misunderstood

Read "Little Misunderstood" reviewed by AAJ Staff

Pittsburgh, PA native, Sheryl Bailey knows how to serve up frenzied fusion guitar/guitar synth, deliver sultry, hot grooves, and deftly handle jazz standards. She tips her pick and pen to the harmonics and compositional, solo-laden works of Mike Stern or Chick Corea. She hangs tight, delivers punchy, and remains breathlessly fluid in her stylings. Her varied guitar voicings allow a wide range of expression and therefore extended listener interest levels -- in a word, variety. At times you might think ...


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