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Nils Wogram Root 70 with Strings: Riomar

Read "Riomar" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Venerable German trombonist Nils Wogram and his long-running Root 70 ensemble are known for cagey and divergent progressive jazz excursions. On Riomar he summons a three-piece strings section to integrate within the standard modern jazz format line of attack, as opposed to simply providing embellishments. One of many highlights is framed on alto saxophonist Hayden Chisholm's fluid notes and wistful tone. He projects a Paul Desmond-like West Coast “cool jazz" attribute, morphed with silky Charlie Parker-ish flurries. Moreover, Wogram leads ...

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Nils Wogram Septet: Complete Soul

Read "Complete Soul" reviewed by Bruce Lindsay

Trombonist and composer Nils Wogram is one of Germany's most imaginative and inventive musicians, a player with over 20 albums to his credit as leader or co-leader with a formidable ability to play across a broad spectrum of styles, from small group improvisation to big bands. He works regularly with his Septet, his Nostalgia Trio, and in duos with trombonist Connie Bauer and pianist Simon Nabatov--past collaborators include trumpeter Cuong Vu. Complete Soul is the Nils Wogram Septet's debut recording, ...

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Nils Wogram/Simon Nabatov: The Move

Read "The Move" reviewed by Budd Kopman

Trombonist Nils Wogram has been playing and recording with pianist Simon Nabatov for the past ten years, and they have developed a very close musical comraderie. The Move is composed of seven pieces, three by Wogram and four by Nabatov, that explore many different moods and emotions, many times with good-natured humor. The record has the feeling of a recital--the music sounds very through-composed and rehearsed--but that could just as easily come from good composition and exceptional ...

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Nils Wogram & Simon Nabatov: The Move

Read "The Move" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

Nils Wogram and Simon Nabatov have long been musical brothers in arms. They have played in each other's quartets and recorded three albums as a duo, of which The Move, recorded at Koln's Loft, is their latest. The compositions are divided about equally. It is immediately and manifestly apparent that the two have established an innate ease and understanding. They take in classical music, add some theatrical flair, and without question extrapolate into free jazz.

Wogram's lines are ...

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Nils Wogram - ROOT 70: ROOT 70

Read "ROOT 70" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

The prizewinning German trombonist gets a chance to flaunt his remarkable chops on this briskly articulated outing. The artist’s Root 70 quartet abides by something akin to a rolling and tumbling musical demeanor. As Wogram and alto saxophonist Hayden Chisholm, guide the rhythm section thru a cavalcade of ebulliently executed, and routinely complex unison choruses. Brimming with bouncy and swiftly enacted modern jazz style arrangements, the trombonist exhibits astounding faculties by spewing forth impossibly fast 16th notes atop the rhythm ...

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Nils Wogram/Konrad Bauer/Dominic Duval: Serious Fun + One

Read "Serious Fun + One" reviewed by Derek Taylor

The CIMP meeting between German improvising trombonists Nils Wogram and Konrad Bauer captured on Serious Fun was one of the most unusual and satisfying entries in the label’s batch of 2000 releases. Unbeknownst to most listeners (myself included) the session that yielded that disc had an addendum. Bassist Dominic Duval, on return trip from Guelph, Ontario stopped by the Spirit Room shortly after the original session and joining the Germans engaged in a fruitful second one.

Duval’s presence makes for ...

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Nils Wogram & Konrad Bauer: Serious Fun

Read "Serious Fun" reviewed by Derek Taylor

Though the instrumentation on this disc may initially seem striking, the antecedent for tandem trombone improvisation was actually set way back in the Bop era by J.J. Johnson and Kai Winding. Admittedly those two doyens of the jazz trombone never operated out of reach of a rhythm section and their material was of a far less free-form nature, but the spirit remains the same across the styles and the years. The free improvisatory possibilities of the instrument have since been ...


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