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ALBUM REVIEWS

Buster Williams: Audacity

Read "Audacity" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

On Audacity, his first disc as the man-in-charge since 2004's restorative Griot Liberte, venerable bassist and jazz gentlemen Buster Williams delivers a stellar set of six potent, highly charged originals mixed generously with originals from long-time band members saxophonist Steve Wilson, drummer Lenny White and pianist George Colligan. Generous is the key word here. Humble yet eminently assured of his ability, agility and legacy, Williams spans the decades from '69 with Herbie Hancock's jazz/rock Mwandishi sextet through contemporary ...

INTERVIEWS

Buster Williams: Take No Prisoners

Read "Buster Williams: Take No Prisoners" reviewed by George Colligan

[ Editor's Note: The following interview is reprinted from George Colligan's blog, Jazztruth]I first heard bassist Buster Williams on a Herbie Hancock recording called VSOP Live (Columbia, 1976). I remember thinking that their version of Hancock's “Toys" was pretty wild stuff. In addition to hearing him on some other recordings like Hancock's Sextant (Columbia, 1973)," the group Sphere's Four in One(Elektra/Musician, 1982), or Sarah Vaughan's Sassy Swings The Tivoli (Mercury, 1963), my friend David Ephross and I used ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Buster Williams: Griot Libert

Read "Griot Libert" reviewed by Brandt Reiter

All great jazz essentially tells the same story: “This is what it's like to be alive, right here, right now. First-call bass vet Buster Williams' latest disc, Griot Libertè, while no exception, tells an additional one: he loves his wife. Using her recovery from a serious illness as a jumping off point, Williams leads a crack quartet with vibraphonist Stefon Harris, pianist George Colligan, and drummer Lenny White through a post bop program of six excellent self-penned originals and two ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Buster Williams: Griot Libert

Read "Griot Libert" reviewed by John Kelman

The instrumental lineup may mimic the Modern Jazz Quartet and, to be sure, Buster Williams' choice of vibes as the other front-line instrument was so that he could similarly “express a certain softness in [the] music." But that's where the comparison ends. Griot Libertè may also swing on the light side like MJQ, but the musical choices are far more weighty.

Opening with the modal workout “Nomads," Williams is quick to establish his dark and meaty tone, placed high in ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Buster Williams: Pinnacle

Read "Pinnacle" reviewed by Douglas Payne

One of the great losses to jazz is that Herbie Hancock's 1970-73 Mwandishi band could not have been as profitable as it was protean, progressive and ever too-briefly productive. Launched from the spaces that fostered Bitches Brew, Hancock introduced elements of both the avant-garde and soul jazz to create a groove that was as unusual and provocative in sound as it was striking in its musical excellence.Hancock's young sextet was utterly prepared to traverse and unite such opposing ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Buster Williams: Crystal Reflections

Read "Crystal Reflections" reviewed by Douglas Payne

Bassist Buster Williams is well featured here on this pretty, interesting set from 1976, his second disc as a leader. Crystal Reflections concentrates on exploratory duets with keyboardist Kenny Barron (the exceptional Barron original, “The Enchanted Flower"), pianist Jimmy Rowles (two versions of “I Dream Too Much") and vibraphonist Roy Ayers ("My Funny Valentine").Elsewhere, Williams combines with Barron, Ayers and drummer Billy Hart for three impressionistic pieces: William's sensitive “Prism," Cole Porter's “I Love You" and Roy Ayers's ...


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