Articles | Popular | Future

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bennie Wallace: Disorder at the Border, The Music of Coleman Hawkins

Read "Disorder at the Border, The Music of Coleman Hawkins" reviewed by Laurel Gross

Left New York's Jazz Standard last month barefoot because the band blew my socks (and even my boots) off. Baby it was cold outside, a December night threatening snow. But Bennie Wallace and the boys had played so hot I was warmed up inside and so immune to any chill. Wallace has been working on his tribute to Coleman Hawkins for some time and to celebrate the 2007 Justin Time CD release of Disorder at the Border: ...

INTERVIEWS

Bennie Wallace: Disorder at the Border

Read "Bennie Wallace: Disorder at the Border" reviewed by Donald Elfman

Saxophonist Bennie Wallace, also known for his clarinet work, moved to New York in 1971 after graduating from the University of Tennessee, playing with Monty Alexander, Sheila Jordan and others before debuting as a leader in 1978. He has released numerous records for Enja and also had a pair of highly-regarded discs for Blue Note in the late 1980s. In the fall of 2007, he brought an ambitious project to New York City, celebrating the work of the legendary Coleman ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bennie Wallace: Disorder at the Border: The Music of Coleman Hawkins

Read "Disorder at the Border: The Music of Coleman Hawkins" reviewed by J Hunter

Tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins' musical footprints stretch back to the 1920s, when he played with Louis Armstrong in Fletcher Henderson's orchestra. It's true that Hawkins was one of the forerunners of bebop, and went on to play and record with Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, and John Coltrane. But Hawk's signature recording of the standard “Body and Soul dates back to 1939, when he was playing in Europe with legends like Benny Carter and Django Reinhardt. Hawkins is a star Bennie ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bennie Wallace: Disorder at the Border: The Music of Coleman Hawkins

Read "Disorder at the Border: The Music of Coleman Hawkins" reviewed by Robert R. Calder

This is a stomping band, as Coleman Hawkins said of the Fletcher Henderson orchestra he -- and the hitherto mostly awkward tenor saxophone -- grew up together with. Louis Armstrong and his hero the great cellist Pablo Casals inspired Hawkins' phrasing and timing, Art Tatum and J.S. Bach his harmonic command. His nickname “Bean" referred to high intelligence, he was an instrumental virtuoso with immense stamina and invention qua improviser, a passionate complex man never to be underrated.

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bennie Wallace: The Nearness of You

Read "The Nearness of You" reviewed by Rich Friedman

In their quest to beef up a CD’s exposure, good-intentioned industry insiders can sometimes unintentionally steer an album down a dead-end path. On the cover of Bennie Wallace’s The Nearness of You, a voluptuous woman clings to his shoulder looking seductively at his sax. The liner notes feature another babe in a low-cut evening dress resting on a piano with a sax. Viagra-infused lounge lizards trying to impress their first dates with their impeccable taste in mood music—and Park Avenue ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bennie Wallace: Bennie Wallace in Berlin

Read "Bennie Wallace in Berlin" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Bennie Wallace, we are glad you are back from Hollywood...

I whole-heartedly agree with magazine-mate Glenn Astarita in his summation of Bennie Wallace’s new Enja recording Bennie Wallace in Berlin, when he states that “Bennie Wallace is irrefutably one of the finest tenor saxophonists alive." I am a relative late comer to Mr. Wallace’s music. I had known him by reputation and reading (two ways of “knowing" that are sorely lacking once compared to listening ), and Live in Berlin ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bennie Wallace: Bennie Wallace In Berlin

Read "Bennie Wallace In Berlin" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Bennie Wallace is irrefutably one of the finest tenor saxophonists alive. Although his distinguishable talents sometimes lack the widespread recognition he justifiably deserves. With this live release, the tenorist performs with a superior rhythm section. They pep up Gershwin, and Arlen standards, while the leader contributes three pieces to this vibrantly enacted set. Wallace’s fluent, angular lines and acute utilization of all registers is subsidized by his broad, corpulent tone. Whether deconstructing or retooling a familiar ballad or adhering to ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bennie Wallace: Moodsville

Read "Moodsville" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Here's another set of standards, a bunch of songs out of The Great American Songbook. The line-up: Tenor sax out in front of the piano/bass/drums rhythm section. Nothing earthshaking here...But it's done on this Moodsville, with such style and reverence, with a distinct muscular-toned tenor flavor.The three rhythm guys on the disc--Mulgrew Miller on piano; Peter Washington, bass; and Lewis Nash doing the drum chores--are all better known in jazz circles than leader/tenor man Bennie Wallace, ...


Let Me Forget

"Let Me Forget" is from the album Lisipi and the video was taken from a live concert at the Bflat jazz club in Cagliari, Italy on January 17, 2019. The Rome-based trio consists of Liliya Akhmetzyanova on piano, Silvio Canargiu on bass, and Pierpaolo Frailis on drums.

Buy Album