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Jazz Singers in the 1950s – Sarah Vaughan, Helen Merrill, Dinah Washington and Abbey Lincoln (1954 - 1962)

Read "Jazz Singers in the 1950s – Sarah Vaughan, Helen Merrill, Dinah Washington and Abbey Lincoln (1954 - 1962)" reviewed by Russell Perry

Many jazz singers of the 1950s continued the tradition of recording with major instrumentalists who were given the space to improvise, feeding off the collaboration. In 1954, EmArCy records matched three of their singers, representing the wide range of their offerings--Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington and Helen Merrill--with jazz ensembles featuring their rising star, trumpeter Clifford Brown. Brown's quintet partner, Max Roach anchored several outings that featured his wife, Abbey Lincoln with the all-star ensembles including trumpeter Booker Little, trombonist Julian ...

RADIO

Celebrating Sarah Vaughan And A New Betty Carter Recording

Read "Celebrating Sarah Vaughan And A New Betty Carter Recording" reviewed by Mary Foster Conklin

The final Sunday of Womens History Month includes new releases from Bob Dorough, Gabrielle Stravelli, Patricia Barber plus a first listen to Betty Carter's first posthumous recording of a live 1992 concert in the early days of Jazz at Lincoln Center, with birthday shout outs to legendary vocalists Sarah Vaughan, Aretha Franklin, Astrud Gilberto, and Pearl Bailey, blues guitarist Etta Baker and saxophonist Ben Webster, among others. Playlist Ben Webster “Weep for Me" from Ballads (Phoenix) 00:00 Dave's ...

BUILDING A JAZZ LIBRARY

Vocal Jazz: 1969-2001

Read "Vocal Jazz: 1969-2001" reviewed by Mathew Bahl

The Dark Age followed by the Renaissance. The tumultuous changes of the 1960s radically changed the American musical landscape. Jazz fell off the American cultural radar, nightclubs closed their doors and record companies moved on to rock. With few opportunities to work and little money to be made, jazz became a music played by the dedicated for the devoted. Jazz singers, who had always acted as a bridge between the jazz and non-jazz audience, found that the middle ...

REASSESSING

Sarah Vaughan: Sophisticated Lady - The Duke Ellington Songbook Collection

Read "Sarah Vaughan: Sophisticated Lady - The Duke Ellington Songbook Collection" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Sarah VaughanSophisticated Lady: The Duke Ellington Songbook CollectionOJC2013 Some long-ago forgotten jazz magazine once went out on a limb to name the most important figures in jazz history. It went something like this (chronologically): Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis and John Coltrane. That is a nice and succinct list that many could defend or deny. Breaking things down further, who might be the most important female ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Sarah Vaughan / Woody Herman: On the Radio: The 1963 "Live" Guard Sessions

Read "On the Radio: The 1963 "Live" Guard Sessions" reviewed by Florence Wetzel

This unique CD brings together Sarah Vaughan and Woody Herman, two of jazz's strongest talents. Shortly after a studio recording made together under Vaughan's name, the pair joined forces in 1963 for a series of radio programs called “The Guard Sessions," which were sponsored by the US National Guard as a tool for recruitment. On the Radio: The 1963 “Live" Guard Sessions was culled from these programs and features eight songs with Vaughan backed by Herman's orchestra and eight songs ...

FILM REVIEWS

Sarah Vaughan: Live in '58 & '64

Read "Sarah Vaughan: Live in '58 & '64" reviewed by Jim Santella

Sarah Vaughan Live in '58 & '64 Jazz Icons 2007

With the camera on Sarah Vaughan and the microphone picking up every pearly note from her performance, these three black and white sessions work wonders for the soul. She was one of the best. No one could deliver a ballad the way she did, and many singers followed in her footsteps.

She's featured here filming in a Swedish television studio ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Sarah Vaughan: After Hours at the London House

Read "After Hours at the London House" reviewed by Samuel Chell

It's best not to assume you have this recording, even if you do. Vaughan recorded two albums entitled After Hours--one a 1961 Roulette session with bass and guitar accompaniment, the other this recently reissued 1958 Mercury recording featuring the legendary singer with her regular trio, joined by four guest musicians from the Count Basie band. Although not as well known, this latter recording is the better bet, if only because of the presence of Thad Jones and Frank Wess, along ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Sarah Vaughan: Love Songs

Read "Love Songs" reviewed by Jim Santella

Recorded between January 1949 and January 1953, this compilation of fourteen romantic ballads by one of the word's greatest interpreters moves nice and slow. With the lush sounds of a full orchestra in support, Sarah Vaughan weaves her magic spell delicately and with true passion.

While the album includes several well-known instrumental soloists and leaders in various lineups, they're here only to accompany. Vaughan interprets each love song slowly, with tenderness and with a gentle caress. She was ...


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