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ALBUM REVIEWS

Max Roach & Archie Shepp: The Long March

Read "The Long March" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Bebop was considered a radical departure for jazz music during its formation in the 1940s and 1950s, pioneered by drummer Max Roach, Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie among others. Coupled with tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp's 1960s avant-garde jazz proclivities, the artists respectively helped procure a prismatic and non-traditional perspective on the jazz idiom. However, their discographies indicate sojourns into more mainstream ventures as well. This duo outing was captured live at a 1979 performance at Jazzfestival Willisau in Switzerland and ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Max Roach / Archie Shepp: The Long March

Read "The Long March" reviewed by Troy Collins

Recorded live in concert at the Willisau Jazz Festival on August 30, 1979, The Long March documents another of drummer Max Roach's historic duo collaborations with the leaders of the jazz avant-garde. This stellar date with tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp follows Streams of Consciousness (Piadrum, 1977), with pianist Abdullah Ibrahim, and Birth and Rebirth (Black Saint, 1978), with multi-instrumentalist Anthony Braxton, predating Historic Concerts (Soul Note, 1979), his meeting with pianist Cecil Taylor, by only a few months. ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Max Roach: Jazz Contrasts & Introducing Johnny Griffin

Read "Max Roach: Jazz Contrasts & Introducing Johnny Griffin" reviewed by Francis Lo Kee

Kenny Dorham Jazz Contrasts (Keepnews Collection) Riverside-Concord 2008 Johnny Griffin Introducing (RVG) Blue Note 2008

These two fantastic recordings feature the great drumming of the late Max Roach. His playing is flawless and demonstrates how a drummer can be both dramatic soloist and sensitive accompanist. Kenny Dorham was ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Max Roach: We Insist! Freedom Now Suite

Read "We Insist! Freedom Now Suite" reviewed by Chris May

Re-released following the passing of drummer Max Roach in August 2007, We Insist! Freedom Now Suite (Candid, 1960) remains a work of enduring musical and social importance. Notwithstanding Roach's central role in the creation of bop, or his later hard bop explorations with trumpeter Clifford Brown, it is, by some margin, the most perfectly realised album he recorded.

1960 was the year in which black Americans' struggle for civil rights reached critical mass. In February, anti-segregationist lunch-counter sit-ins ...

RHYTHM IN EVERY GUISE

A Tribute To Max Roach

Read "A Tribute To Max Roach" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Introduction

I can't recall the reason why I picked Percussion Bitter Sweet out of a record store bin in the mid-sixties. It was one of the first recordings I ever purchased. Apart from Max's brilliant drumming and knotty yet accessible compositions, it served as an introduction to iconic musicians like Eric Dolphy, Booker Little, Clifford Jordan, Mal Waldron, Art Davis, and Abbey Lincoln. Several years later, I experienced Max's mastery of the drums in person. Spanning just a portion of ...

NEW YORK BEAT

Moments with Max

Read "Moments with Max" reviewed by Nick Catalano

The passing of Max Roach will initiate countless reminiscences, retrospectives, and reassessments. With his appearances alongside Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie on “Ko-Ko"--the seminal early bebop release--"The Birth of The Cool" with Miles Davis, and on countless recordings with Bud Powell, Thelonious Monk and other bop pioneers, Max set a new standard for percussion even before he started his first group with Clifford Brown in 1954.

Soon, writers and music folk everywhere will be recalling incidents from Max's ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Max Roach: Jazz in 3/4 Time

Read "Jazz in 3/4 Time" reviewed by Samuel Chell

At the time of its appearance in 1957, this album, currently part of the limited EmArcy reissue series, was considered somewhat revolutionary due to its all-waltz program. That's become a moot point after all of the triple-meter jazz material that would follow--from “All Blues" to “Waltz for Debby" to “Someday My Prince Will Come." What makes this session essential listening is the masterful solo work, and not simply by Sonny Rollins.

With Clifford Brown gone, trumpeter Kenny Dorham ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Max Roach/Abdullah Ibrahim: Streams of Consciousness

Read "Streams of Consciousness" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza

Abdullah Ibrahim, then known as Dollar Brand, went into the studio with Max Roach on September 20, 1977. In his brief but all-encompassing notes, Roach says that there were no rehearsals and no plans as to what they were going to record. Sure, it is said that they were friends, and shared social and cultural backgrounds. Those are good points of reference but there has to be something more: a perspicacity, a feel, anticipation and vision that have to course ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Max Roach: The Complete Mercury Max Roach Plus Four Sessions

Read "The Complete Mercury Max Roach Plus Four Sessions" reviewed by AAJ Staff

In Mosaic Records' quest for some of the significant but overlooked early recordings of jazz legends, the label has assiduously studied, gathered and documented an important and prolific recording phase of Max Roach's career.More than a decade after his first recorded appearance with Coleman Hawkins and his subsequent astounding premiere with Charlie Parker that set the jazz world on its ear, Roach was recovering from a monumental setback to his plans to record his own quintet. The deaths ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Max Roach: The Complete Mercury Max Roach Plus Four Sessions

Read "The Complete Mercury Max Roach Plus Four Sessions" reviewed by AAJ Staff

In Mosaic Records' quest for some of the significant but overlooked early recordings of jazz legends, the label has assiduously studied, gathered and documented an important and prolific recording phase of Max Roach's career.More than a decade after his first recorded appearance with Coleman Hawkins and his subsequent astounding premiere with Charlie Parker that set the jazz world on its ear, Roach was recovering from a monumental setback to his plans to record his own quintet. The deaths ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Max Roach/Jon Jang/Jiebing Chen: Beijing Trio

Read "Beijing Trio" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Let me suggest a new name for this group. How about the American-Jing Trio? This combination of African-American Max Roach with Chinese-American Jon Jang and Jiebing Chen of China makes an improvisational music, which can be pinned, straight to a map of American music. The recording, a combination of duos and trios of Roach’s drums, Jang’s Piano and Chen’s Erhu a Chinese two-string violin, is an intimate portrait of well, let’s call it blues. Jang has made his career at ...


Giant Steps EP 2

Episode 2 No Respect. Kim is confronted with discrimination in jazz education while working at the Jazz Elders Foundation. Bid Daddy reams Manny for booking two singers at the same time and Mickey gets no respect in the movie business. Cast Mickey Bass, Dr. Jeff Gardere, Gregory Charles Royal, Mark 'Icewater' Gross, Paul Tafoya as 'Manny', Kimberly Singh, Zari Veres Royal and Marist Veres Royal -with James Zollar -trumpet, Bobby Lavell,- tenor sax Anthony Wonsey- piano, Mark Johnson - drums and Billy Johnson - bass.