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If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

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ALBUM REVIEWS

Avram Fefer and Bobby Few: Kindred Spirits

Read "Kindred Spirits" reviewed by Chad Kushins

Sometimes lightning strikes twice. As proof, legendary expatriate Bobby Few has teamed with fellow sound explorer Avram Fefer for two fresh releases of very different character, and with near-perfect results.

On the aptly-titled Kindred Spirits, Few and Fefer offer a slower, more blues-laden repertoire than the more free jazz-oriented Heavenly Places. But don't let this accessibility fool you; both players retain the same lucid command over their respective instruments that was present in their previous endeavors together.

On piano, Few ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Avram Fefer and Bobby Few: Heavenly Places

Read "Heavenly Places" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Saxophonist Avram Fefer and pianist Bobby Few seem something of a sonic odd couple. Few's majestically bluesy, classically-influenced, erudite-yet-free approach is full of flowing beauty, infused with a marrow-deep spirituality. Avram Fefer--especially on tenor--sounds at times like a ragged wound; not a punture or clean slice, but a deep raw scrape producing a big roaring sound full of rough edges. Beauty and the Beast, you might say; not that Fefer doesn't slip into moments tenderness and delicacy himself, when the ...