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CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Trespass Trio: The Spirit Of Piteşti

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Swedish reedman Martin Küchen ploughs a rich variety of furrows, from explorative improvised summits to his rambunctious Angles aggregations, but one of the most enduring has been his Trespass Trio. On The Spirit Of Pitești, the fourth entry in the band's discography, he is joined by the same crew there since the inception, bassist Per Zanussi and drummer Raymond Strid. As always Küchen imparts a political subtext to the music through his choice of titles, in this case alluding to ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Trespass Trio + Joe McPhee: Human Encore

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Portugal is one of the most free-jazz friendly countries on the planet, and the innovative Clean Feed label is one of the reasons why. With over two hundred releases thus far, Clean Feed has been documenting the next wave(s) of avant-free music. This includes the mighty Trespass Trio, a powerhouse group of improvisers consisting of Swedish saxophonist Martin Küchen, Norwegian double bassist Per Zanussi, and Swedish drummer Raymond Strid. Clean Feed released Trespass Trio's debut Was There to Illuminate the ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Trespass Trio + Joe McPhee: Human Encore

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Sweden-based Trespass Trio aligns with American improvising legend Joe McPhee for a live set, recorded 2012 at Salao Brazil. The artists' camaraderie, gamesmanship, and intuitive synergy become quite evident from the onset. From a holistic perspective, the band's rugged approach balances a prevalent degree of experimentation with familiar modern jazz terrain. Indeed, an audience-pleaser; even by free jazz conventions, the players render a cornucopia of disparate angles and propositions. “A Different Kodo" is immersed in a free-bop ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Trespass Trio: "...was there to illuminate the night sky..."

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In the album notes to Trespass Trio's “...was there to illuminate the night sky...", saxophonist Martin Kÿchen provides a colorful yet somewhat fragmented essay, regarding the evisceration of society, partly tied into the Iraq war and the everlasting Israel-Palestine conflict. He sets the stage for a life force panorama, iterated through the power of music that casts a dour or ominous state of affairs. Recorded in Norway, the Scandinavian trio exercises some bloodletting here.

The injustices of society ...


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