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MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Two Sides of Marc Copland: Quartet and Solo

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Anyone interested in discovering the fascinating story of pianist Marc Copland should start out by reading John Kelman's excellent article: “Marc Copland: Growth Through Collaboration" (2005). It follows the trajectory of an artist that has evolved immensely throughout his career, with the most radical change being the shift in instrument from saxophone to piano. This shift happened because Copland needed to express himself fully and discovered that the sounds that he heard were sounds for the piano rather than the ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Marc Copland: Nightfall

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Elementally essential, Marc Coplandlate career resurgence/reemergence/renaissance continues undaunted with NightFall, the pianist's first all solo full length since Alone (Pirouet, 2010). In that span, some may have argued there's a huge head-space between Bill Evans and Keith Jarrett and some may have not, but either way Marc Copland commands the foreground. Scott Lafaro's moody elegy “Jade Visions" opens Nightfall with a challenging, yet infinitely knowing re-imagining, conjuring both Evans and LaFaro while sitting alone with his ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Marc Copland: Nightfall

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Between 2006 and 2012 pianist Marc  Copland produced a rich discography on the Pirouet Records label. With a cast of top level sidemen--Gary Peacock, Paul Motian, John Abercrombie, Drew Gress, Billy Hart...you get the idea--he shaped up his distinctive sound and and lifted his profile into the stars. The year 2012 saw Copland's last Pirouet release, Some More Love Songs.  Then, in 2015, the fruit of the establishment of his own record label, InnerVoiceJazz, gave us Zenith, an excellent quartet ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Marc Copland: Better By Far

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Marc Copland got his start in jazz in New York City as a sometimes plugged-in alto saxophonist, working with drummer Chico Hamilton's Quartet, and releasing an overlooked album, Friends (Oblivion Records, 1973) featuring his own quartet. Then he went away, and came back as a pianist, and has since shaped himself into one of finest jazz piano guys around, an artist with a supple touch, a feel for intricately gorgeous melodies and a deep immersion into complex harmonies.

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Daniel Schlaeppi/Marc Copland: More Essentials

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The experience of this duo outing, More Essentials, begins with the packaging, the cover art, a gorgeous photo of two jelly fish immersed in the softened hues of shallow submersion in the sea. The disc spins, an introductory bass solo by Daniel Schlaeppi that leads into Miles Davis' “Blue In Green," with pianist Marc Copland's liquid, anti-gravitational, chord-to-chord glide as lovely as anything he's ever laid down, immersed in turquoise, tethered by the (planetary) Neptune-ian pull of bassist Daniel Schlaeppi's ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Marc Copland: Zenith and Haunted Heart

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Zenith InnerVoice Jazz 2016 There's some shared, ongoing history here. Between drummer Joey Baron and bassist Drew Gress, pianist Marc Copland has logged some pretty decent music time. Add trumpeter Ralph Alessi and there's a new element, one not found in the rhythm section's work with guitarist John Abercrombie or in the trio where Copland and Baron find themselves with bassist Gary Peacock. And Copland has also worked with the drummer and bassist in his own ...

BAILEY'S BUNDLES

Jazz Quanta March — Five Pianos: Marc Copland, Bill Stewart, Julian Shore, Bob Wijnen, Pablo Held

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Okay, Okay...OKAY! Bill Stewart is not a pianist, but his long-time collaborator Bill Carrothers is, so, LAY OFF! Marc Copland Zenith Inner Voice Jazz 2015 Pianist Marc Copland composes with a certain use of darkness, an updated musical version of Caravaggio's use of chiaroscuro in painting. Copland is aided in his alchemic light-shifting by his regular bassist Drew Gress and drummer Joey baron. Joining the trio is trumpeter Ralph Alessi, ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Marc Copland: Zenith

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Whenever pianist Marc Copland is a sideman on a session, much less leading the session, there are very high expectations for the music. Whether it is the lustrous sound he gets from the keyboard, which includes his pedalling, the dense harmonies which create shimmering harmonics or the intelligence of his lines and compositions, Copland has a unique voice and musical personality. Zenith meets and exceeds any expectations one might have; it is a joy to listen from many ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Marc Copland: Zenith

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After releasing a series of excellent but under-recognized CDs on various small record labels--starting in the mid-1980s--pianist Marc Copland rose in prominence in 2006 when he took up residence on Germany's Pirouet Records. The highlight of his Pirouet days was a set of trio discs wrapped in a marketing package dubbed “The New York Trio Recordings." Modinha (2006); Voices (2007); and Night Whispers (2008), with a shifting set of band mates: Gary Peacock or Drew Gress on bass, Paul Motian ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Daniel Schlaeppi/Marc Copland: More Essentials

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More Essentials is just that, a continuation, after much touring, of the partnership between bassist Daniel Schlaeppi and pianist Marc Copland. The extremely high standards set by its predecessor, Essentials are more than met by this second release. The structure of this release is the same as before: tunes, some more, some less well known (including one original by Copland) are connected by “Essentials," which are short improvisations, mostly by Schlaeppi, with one duo effort. These are numbered ...