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Articles | Featured | Future

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Marc Baron: Hidden Tapes

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Since the turn of the millennium, Marc Baron has taken us on an interesting aural journey (albeit one that could have been more fully documented on disc.) He has evolved from an improvising alto saxophonist--maybe best represented by the sax quartet on Propagations (Potlatch, 2008)--through transitional experiments such as the “interesting" Formnction (Potlatch, 2009) by the duo Narthex, on which the sounds of bass and saxophone were replaced by constant frequency electronic tones, and a 2012 album on Cathnor which ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Marc Baron, Bertrand Denzler, Jean-Luc Guionnet, Stephane Rives: Propagations

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Just when it seemed that the saxophone quartet might be a format that had run out of ideas or momentum, along come this French foursome to add new vitality to the genre. For reasons that are not entirely clear, even when they have included otherwise free, radical players (I'm thinking of Julius Hemphill, David Murray, Lol Coxhill, Paul Dunmall) saxophone quartets have too often opted to play it safe; a sweeping generalization, perhaps, but one often borne out.