Support All About Jazz

All About Jazz needs your help and we have a deal. Pay $20 and we'll hide those six pesky Google ads that appear on every page, plus this box and the slideout box on the right for a full year! You'll also fund website expansion.

I want to help

Jazz Articles


John Warren: Following On

Read "Following On" reviewed by

John Warren was fortunate in having the services of a cross-section of British jazz talent in the realization of Following On. Their talents and his writing and arranging meld nicely here, the overall feeling being that of friends coming together, with a view towards mutual cooperation.

There are, however, negative implications. There are times when it's hard to get behind the surface elegance and urbanity of the music. An effortlessness in Warren's work makes this inevitable, perhaps, but is often ...


John Warren: Finally Beginning

Read "Finally Beginning" reviewed by

John Warren is a veteran of the British jazz scene having turned in work with baritone saxophonist John Surman over the decades. He's here exclusively as a composer and arranger and responsible for the entire program of music, apart from a reading of Thelonious Monk's “Ruby My Dear" which falls right in with the overall ethos, even as it retains its individuality.

Warren is fortunate indeed in having been able to assemble a crack band to give life to his ...


John Surman / John Warren: Tales of the Algonquin

Read "Tales of the Algonquin" reviewed by

Much was in the air in early-'70s British music, where various configurations explored the fringes of tradition while maintaining allegiance to fixed forms. Tales of the Algonquin exemplifies the times perfectly. One complaint: the audio is only passable. (But if this transfer was taken from an LP, the stunted sound is understandable.)In any case, John Warren's music more than compensates for any sonic flaws. “With Terry's Help slides and swells in, regal but anticipatory, soon kicking into a ...


John Surman/John Warren: Tales of the Algonquin

Read "Tales of the Algonquin" reviewed by

As in most European countries, jazz in Britain prior to the '60s was largely a copycat of its American counterparts. But with the emergence of artists like trumpeters Harry Beckett and Kenny Wheeler, bassists Graham Collier and Harry Miller, and saxophonists Stan Sulzmann and Alan Skidmore, a very specific yet remarkably diverse complexion began to emerge. From his emergence in the mid-'60s to 1971, baritone/soprano saxophonist John Surman appeared on nearly forty recordings, including some that would ultimately ...

Support our sponsor

Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY IT  

New Service For Musicians!

Boost your visibility at All About Jazz and drive traffic to your website with Premium Musician Profile.