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LIVE REVIEWS

Jake Shimabukuro Live: Ukulele Jazz

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Jake Shimabukuro The Coach House San Juan Capistrano, CA February 2, 2007

One of the longest operating jazz venues in the neighborhood just south of Los Angeles, and Orange County's premier supper club, The Coach House in San Juan Capistrano continues to bring in some of the best musical artists. Their decision to bring in ukulele jazzman Jake Shimabukuro for a repeat performance this year meant another sold out event. For a club ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jake Shimabukuro: Gently Weeps

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Hawaiian ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro covers a wide range of musical styles. Like a classical guitarist who can't be satisfied with a narrow repertoire of known entities, Shimabukuro reaches out to the worlds of jazz, blues, funk, folk, rock and beyond. He performs twelve selections a cappella, while the remaining five bonus tracks feature a large number of guests.

Shimabukuro opens Gently Weeps with George Harrison's tune “While My Guitar Gently Weeps, which features the expressive slide technique ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jake Shimabukuro: Gently Weeps

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Pity the poor ukulele. Consigned to a less-than-respectable fate thanks to Tiny Tim and movies like Elvis Presley's Paradise, Hawaiian Style, this small four-string cousin to the guitar just can't get any respect. Jake Shimabukuro has been working hard to change that over the past few years on albums like Skyline (Epic, 2003) and Dragon (Hitchhike, 2005). But while earlier recordings have placed Shimabukuro's diminutive instrument in larger group settings, Gently Weeps is all the more remarkable for being a ...