All About Jazz

Home » Articles | Reviews Only

Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

Articles | Featured | Future

LIVE REVIEWS

Buenos Aires International Jazz Festival 2017

Read "Buenos Aires International Jazz Festival 2017" reviewed by

Buenos Aires International Jazz Festival Buenos Aires, Argentina November 15-20, 2017 Mid November in Buenos Aires is a special time of the year. True to the meaning of the city's name, the air is crisp and fresh and blossoming jacaranda trees bathe the greater metropolitan area in a dazzling shower of purple hues. And, for lovers of jazz in all its forms, the annual Buenos Aires International Jazz Festival stages an extravagant six-day program of concerts, ...

OLD, NEW, BORROWED AND BLUE

Taken with Terrasson

Read "Taken with Terrasson" reviewed by

While reading reviews about the 2010 Winter Jazzfest in New York City, I experienced a sensory overload, despite the fact that I hadn't even been in attendance. The list of musicians that performed at the event seemed too good to be true, as did many of the reviews, so I vowed to check it out for myself when the event rolled around again in January of 2011. When the festival dates were announced, I bought my tickets ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jacky Terrasson: Push

Read "Push" reviewed by

There's no lack of variety on pianist Jacky Terrasson's debut for Concord Records. With his trio and special guests, Terrasson generates a multihued program, featuring jazz-funk, spunky bop and cleverly envisioned ballads, such as Thelonious Monk's timeless classic, “Ruby My Dear." On this piece, Terrasson and harmonica ace Gregoire Maret share the lead via sweet-toned passages and a capacious backdrop that elicits imagery of a sultry breeze. The soloists caress and rephrase the familiar theme into a ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jacky Terrasson: Push

Read "Push" reviewed by

Since winning the Thelonious Monk Piano Competition 17 years ago, Jacky Terrasson has ranged far and wide from his original, striking early trio (with minimalist drummer/percussionist Leon Parker), exploring formats from solo and various duos to larger ensembles. For this, his first album for a new label, he returns with a new trio, featuring recent Monk Competition-winning bassist Ben Williams and drummer Jamire Williams, augmented by guests. While Terrasson has been likened to Keith Jarrett and Herbie Hancock, ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jacky Terrasson: Push

Read "Push" reviewed by

There are three qualities about pianist Jacky Terrasson's music that make it irresistible and riveting. The first is that it dances interminably. Secondly, it is jagged and angular--an epithet often used to describe the music of Thelonious Monk and which suits Terrasson well as, even with his singularly distinctive voice, he is genealogically connected. Finally, Terrasson has a penchant for a playful, almost puckish, interpretation, where humor is implicit. As such he negotiates all melodies, even those that are contemplative, ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jacky Terrasson: Mirror

Read "Mirror" reviewed by

In a tenure with the vaunted Blue Note label that has produced ten full-length CDs in a variety of settings and production styles, Jacky Terrasson has never recorded a solo piano album. After a hiatus of sorts, the pianist/composer /bandleader has completed that project, though not without some self-admitted soul- searching, creative and otherwise. The wait, however, was worth it.

Mirror is a thing of beauty. Terrasson has proven himself a courageously proficient jazz musician on ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jacky Terrasson: Mirror

Read "Mirror" reviewed by

Jacky Terrasson's claim that he hadn't recorded a solo-piano disc before because he “wasn't ready to take it on is mind boggling, since he has excelled at everything he's attempted: Berklee School of Music, the Monk Competition, his first pro gig as Betty Carter's pianist, and his collaborations with heavy hitters like Cassandra Wilson and Stefon Harris, to name just a few. But then, solo piano is way different than all that; the artist is out on the wire with ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jacky Terrasson: Mirror

Read "Mirror" reviewed by

Pianist Jacky Terrasson has been on a recording hiatus since his 2003 set Smile (Blue Note), but he's back and swinging with this, his first solo outing, revealingly rich in tempos and colors. Terrasson has an ample supply of virile dynamics that can skillfully dip and slide into all sorts of places and moods. It happens here right off with the opener, the Ellington/Mills/Razaf classic, “Caravan. What begins as a turbulent desert windstorm segues into a swaying night journey with ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jacky Terrasson: Mirror

Read "Mirror" reviewed by

If you had to write a headline for the career of Jacky Terrasson it might be “from brash to brilliant." The forty-something pianist took the jazz world by storm, winning the Thelonious Monk piano competition in 1993 only to make some impetuous records that wowed you with his talent. But they didn't register high with their significance.

But like his contemporary Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Terrasson has matured into a more expressive player whose music maintains its staying power. builds on the ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jacky Terrasson: Mirror

Read "Mirror" reviewed by

Solo piano is a risky business: if the pianist hasn't got the stuff, there's absolutely nothing to hide behind. It's not enough to noodle aimlessly, pretending that every note is profound, or to fill the air with thunderous pounding that's more noise than brilliance. There should be real substance: thoughtfulness in both the choice of material and the playing of it; chops, flair, and versatility; and above all, a clear sense of the artist's individual voice and soul.