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Jazz Articles

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Girls in Airports: Fables

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Copenhagen quartet Girls in Airport is in fine form on Fables, its fourth release, and first on the Edition Records label. There are fewer big tunes than before although the band's trademark melodic hooks and rhythmic drive, its understated lyricism and hypnotic grooves are all present in abundance. What's been brought into sharper focus is the emotional currency in the writing and a narrative thread that seems to flow through these nine compositions. Significantly too, the percussive bite that Victor ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Girls in Airports: Kaikoura

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Since releasing its self-titled debut in 2010, the Danish group Girls in Airports has managed to create their own expression, a unique blend of Nordic jazz lyricism, indie-rock influences and sounds from around the world, including the pentatonic scales of Ethiopian music, dub sounds of Jamaica and Brazilian rhythms. This is truly a globalized band if there ever was one. The group's aesthetic foundation relies on the natural melodies of saxophonist and composer Martin Stender, but the ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Girls in Airports: Migration

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The view of the world is not greater than the eyes of the beholder and it is easy to remain bound to a particular culture and musical tradition, trying to find safety in familiar sounds. Beauty, however, is often found in the unexpected and unknown and like true musical travelers; Danish group Girls in Airports has taken a different path than most of its Nordic peers, exploring the warm and vibrant sounds of Africa. Migration, the group's ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Girls in Airports: Girls in Airports

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The influence of world music has been somewhat rare in Danish jazz, with the notable exception of Pierre Dørge's New Jungle Orchestra, which for several years has incorporated Asian music and African folklore into their particular bouncing brand of avant-garde wilderness. The arrival of Girls in Airports signals an altogether different approach to merging different sounds from around the world, an approach that is decidedly influenced by the new Danish melancholy practiced by the likes of guitarist Jakob Bro and ...


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