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Articles | Featured | Future

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

LSD: Trio Colossus

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The detective is hunched over the bar, alone in a dark smoky dive by the waterfront. A blond saunters in, backlit through the gloom by the neon beer light.“Don't you remember me?" she asks.“Why no," he mumbles, “I've got a metal plate in my head and I drink too much vodka."In the background “It Ain't Necessarily So" oozes from Fredrick Lindborg's tenor saxophone. Lindborg, Sjostedt & Daniel's Trio Colossus wails into the night like ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

LSD: Trio Colossus

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The stark, somewhat austere cover art of Trio Colossus, from Swedish saxophonist Fredrik Lindborg's LSD trio, belies the warm, rich music it houses.The sultry opening bars of “It Ain't Necessarily So" set the mood for this impressive recording, which features four Lindborg originals and carefully chosen pieces by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn and Swedish composer Rune Wallebom. From the intimate, moody “Psalm" to the closer “Trio Colossus," Lindborg shows surprising maturity in his compositions, and an ardent sense ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Fredrik Lindborg: The General

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There are those who insist that jazz musicians are born, not made. Swedish saxophonist Fredrik Lindborg makes an interesting exhibit in this “nature versus nurture" argument. He was determined from a very young age to become a jazz musician, and he credits this to the fact that his father began playing Charlie Parker and Billie Holiday records for him from the moment he came home from the hospital.

Born in 1979, Lindborg's formative musical exposure consisted of a decidedly older ...