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Jazz Articles

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Eric Revis Trio: Crowded Solitudes

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In following his own star, bassist Eric Revis continues to explore terrain further off the charts than erstwhile employers Branford Marsalis, Steve Coleman and Kurt Rosenwinkel. For the sequel to the acclaimed City of Asylum (Clean Feed, 2013), Revis retains Kris Davis on piano but replaces Andrew Cyrille with Gerald Cleaver in the drum chair. Revis mixes three group improvs with compositions from his own pen and that of others, but regardless of authorship, the execution remains an egalitarian affair ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Eric Revis Trio: Crowded Solitudes

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Listening to a recording, one can assume, as opposed to attending a performance, involves just one of your five senses, hearing. The concert has of course sight, but something about Eric Revis' Crowded Solitudes suggests other senses to consider. This trio recording follows City Of Asylum (Clean Feed, 2013). Revis has retained pianist Kris Davis, but Gerald Cleaver replaces Andrew Cyrille at the drum chair. Revis, the longtime bassist for Branford Marsalis, can also be heard on the ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Aruan Ortiz Trio with Eric Revis and Gerald Cleaver: Hidden Voices

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Cuban born pianist and composer Aruán Ortiz is just now starting to broaden his long-overdue recognition after two decades as a leader or collaborator. More than ten years prior to his new trio release, Hidden Voices, he had drawn favorable comparisons to Chick Corea and Ornette Coleman with Aruán Ortiz Trio Vol. 1 (Pimienta Records, 2004). That outing featured an entirely different group but clearly set the groundwork for Ortiz' unique approach to creating and executing forward-looking music.

INTERVIEWS

Eric Revis: Trajectory From The Tradition

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The development of an individual voice on the contrabass is important to Eric Revis, one of the strongest players on the scene. His power and musicianship has endeared him to some of the finer musicians, and bands, in jazz. But Revis isn't content to let things lie there. Not that he has to be out front flexing his considerable bass muscles. That's not the point. Through bands that he forms, his compositions, his collaborations, he wants to grow ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Eric Revis: Eric Revis: In Memory Of Things Yet Seen

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Although the title to bassist Eric Revis' quartet offering appears to pay homage to some of the early AACM documents (think pianist Muhal Richard Abrams' unaccompanied manifesto Things To Come From Those Now Gone (Delmark, 1975)), the actuality is a different animal entirely. Having rung the changes since the acclaimed City of Asylum, Revis' outfit acts primarily as a vehicle for exploring imaginative charts drawn from across the band, along with two free jazz classics and two group inventions, this ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Eric Revis Quartet: In Memory Of Things Yet Seen

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Bassist Eric Revis has performed and recorded with saxophonist Branford Marsalis' bands since 1997, and is a first-call session artist. Marsalis appears on two tracks for the bassist's third solo date on the progressive Portugal-based label, Clean Feed Records. The core quintet features a formidable frontline with tenor saxophonist Bill McHenry and alto saxophonist Darius Jones. And diversity is a key driver during a host of jazz-centric formats, constructed on scrappy maneuvers; contrapuntal statements, quirky rhythmic jaunts, and ballsy, hard-hitting ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Eric Revis: In Memory Of Things Yet Seen

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Bassist Eric Revis is a heavyweight in more than one respect. He is doing the improbable in a remarkable way, thereby ignoring collectively imposed and maintained demarcations at work. Armed with his physically very present, raw and vibrant bass sound he beats his track into the realms of freely improvised music. He made his debut as a leader in 2012 with Parallax, on the authoritative Lisboan Clean Feed label, with a dream team of Jason Moran, Ken Vandermark and Nasheet ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Eric Revis: Eric Revis' Parallax

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Bassist Eric Revis is notoriously comfortable within many jazz contexts and vernaculars. As a leader and session man, he's been in the thick of things, toggling between modern mainstream, trad-jazz, Acid Jazz and other crosscutting musical endeavors. Here, he revisits the freer spectrum, supported by an all-star lineup. And while there's certainly no shortage of group-centric expressionism, the bassist doesn't keep the band in a particular mode or style. Revis' menu generates an oscillating aural experience, where each piece stands ...


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