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Derek Bailey // Three Presences at Cafe Oto

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Simon H. Fell, Mark Wastell, Alex WardDerek Bailey // Three Presences Cafe OtoLondon March 2, 2018 Many people will have done a double-take upon seeing this evening in the Café Oto programme. Over twelve years after the much-loved guitarist Derek Bailey died on Christmas Day 2005, he seemed to be listed as appearing at the venue. On reading the small print, it became clear that the trio IST (bassist Simon H. Fell, cellist Mark ...


Craft Beer and Jazz

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As I type these words, I'm sitting here sipping on an Apricot Peach Orange Whip Mimosa Gose while listening to Derek Bailey's Improvisation LP. If you aren't aware of Bailey's work, he was a British guitarist who championed the European “free" style. All improv, all the time-with no structure to speak of. Many have argued that Bailey and his angular screech and skronk have no place in anything labeled jazz, or even music for that matter. Purists. Apricot ...


Derek Bailey

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Guitarist Derek Bailey was one of the more prominent and influential musicians from the “first generation of free improvisation" that developed in London in the mid-sixties and gradually promoted the music around the world. Although several members of that generation were leaders, Bailey often seemed the de facto leader of the group. Partly, this was a consequence of his being slightly older than others, Bailey having been born in 1930, compared to Tony Oxley (1938), Trevor Watts (1939), John Stevens ...


Derek Brown: Beatbox Sax

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One man bands are something of a novelty: some guy with a half a dozen instruments (or more)--guitar, drums, harmonica--affixed to his body in various ways. Saxophonist Derek Brown blows the one man band route with just the saxophone on Beatbox Sax. The first reaction on spinning the disc, opening with Brown's original composition, “Catch 'Em Up," could understandably be: “That's not live, he's slipping in loops and salting the saxophonic sonic stew in the studio with electronics." ...


Derek Nash Acoustic Quartet: You've Got To Dig It To Dig It, You Dig?

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You've Got To Dig It To Dig It, You Dig?: not just a groovy album title, but wise words of advice. Saxophonist and bandleader Derek Nash clearly takes this advice to heart, crafting an album that's filled with eminently dig-able music. The advice that inspires Nash and his fellow players, as well as inspiring the album title and a tune of the same name, comes from Thelonious Monk. A few more of Monk's helpful hints--collected in 1960 by ...


Sax Appeal: Funkerdeen

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Three decades since it was established, by leader and alto player Derek Nash, the UK's Sax Appeal still retains the fire and enthusiasm of youth--and a five saxophone front line that's more than capable of translating that energy into a big, bold, crowd-pleasing sound. Funkerdeen is the band's sixth album. As the title suggests, funk is to the fore, but there's also more than a hint of Latin, smooth '80s soul-jazz and a little bit of New Orleans.


Various Brits: Just Not Cricket!

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In the 1972 Monty Python Flying Circus skit “Are You Embarrassed," the announcer reads the lines, “Are you embarrassed easily? I am. But it's nothing to worry about; it's all part of growing up and being British." The announcer goes on to describe embarrassing words like “Shoe" ..... “Megaphone" ..... “Grunties," to test the listener's discomfort level. Somehow, even though the words spoken (in English) by the troupe were in a common language, the humor was quite alien to American ...


Derek Nash: Joyriding

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One of the strengths of the current British jazz scene comes from its core of mainstream, straight-ahead musicians, who focus their creative abilities on drawing fresh nuances from established musical styles; saxophonist Derek Nash is one of them. Joyriding features what he refers to as his “regular quartet," although that phrase does scant justice to the quality of the musicianship. Nash is a member of Jools Holland's Rhythm And Blues Orchestra, a regular presence on BBC TV ...


Tedeschi Trucks Band: Revelator

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A natural extension of Already Free (Victor, 2009), the most recent (but hopefully not the last) studio recording by The Derek Trucks Band, the debut album by the Tedeschi Trucks Band broadens the scope of this blues-rooted music with a bigger and proportionately versatile eleven-piece band. The entire unit kicks in on the catchy opener, “Come See About Me," as double drummers match each other's syncopation in front of a hard-pumping horn section. Kofi Burbridge spins out white-hot ...


Derek Gripper: Finding the New Cape

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In 2002, Cape Town-based guitarist, violist, and composer Derek Gripper began a musical collaboration with multi-instrumentalist Alex van Heerden. In doing so, the two men sparked a musical partnership that would, in only a few months, smash through stylistic boundaries on their debut recording Sagtevlei > (New Cape Records, 2010). Drawing upon the rich ghoema musical tradition of Cape Town, Sagtevlei proved to be a haunting and magical journey into the artistic legacy of the Cape, and showcased two young ...