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Articles | Featured | Future

RADIO

Lee Morgan, Kyle Nasser & More

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The young and very talented Christian Sands leads off this week's episode of Neon Jazz with music from his 2018 CD Facing Dragons. We then segue into his mentor Dr. Billy Taylor and profile Massachusetts native saxophonist Kyle Nasser with music from his latest disc Persistent Fancy. The talented group of young cats manufacturing a funk/jazz sound called The Black Tie Brass debuts their latest CD Mostly Covered. And, finally, we play the tune “Flimsy" form the great British outfit ...

YEAR IN REVIEW

Mike Jurkovic's Best Releases Of 2018

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Fully steeped as I am in two guitars, bass, and drums, I keep listening, learning and thankful the jazz steels my spine. A quick thank you to my patient editors here at All About Jazz and a special thank you to all the musicians who have contacted me from around the world. Let's not stop creating. It's our only defense to the soul gripping chaos that passes these days as living. Nik Bartsch Awase

ALBUM REVIEWS

Christian Sands: Facing Dragons

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Save for a busy, perhaps too restrained take on The Beatles' “Yesterday" and the predictable South American rhythm driven “Sangueo Soul," Facing Dragons is pianist Christian Sands third powerhouse release in a shade over two years. Crisply performed by his core trio, bassist Yasushi Nakamura and the untiring Jerome Jennings on drums, Facing Dragons may not explode out at you like last year's Reach, his debut as a leader, or the concussive live energy that spilled over onto ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Christian Sands: Facing Dragons

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Christian Sands is already being hailed as the greatest jazz pianist of his generation. The question now is will he follow in the footsteps of piano virtuosos like Art Tatum, Oscar Peterson and Errol Garner and concentrate on keyboard fireworks? Or will he choose other outlets for his immense talent, DownBeat magazine seemingly paving the way for this by lauding him as “an imaginative composer" and “clever arranger." Sands, born on May 22 1989, grew up in ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Christian Sands: Reach Further

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With full gale Monk-ian intensity and flair, pianist Christian Sands' five song EP, Reach Further bursts open with “J-Street" like the grandest, most swinging first flower in the new jazz garden. Then you hit repeat. Repeat again. Then you remember there are four more songs and the garden bursts with color. Comprised of two brazen studio originals recorded for but left off 2017's seminal Reach and three utterly dynamic, immediate, and fun live tracks, recorded in March 2018 ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Christian Sands: Reach

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A lot plays into the success of an artist's reach, with content and presentation obviously ranking high on the list. But above all, an artist has to be willing to extend a hand if they expect listeners to do the same. Many simply reach for the musical stars without really considering the need to reach out to potential audiences through the music. Pianist Christian Sands doesn't fall into that trap. His reach--both up and out--is long and wide, exemplified on ...