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CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Chris Abrahams & Sabine Vogel: Kopfuberwelle

Read "Kopfuberwelle" reviewed by

Kopfüberwelle features the duo of German flautist Sabine Vogel and The Necks' pianist, Chris Abrahams, uncharacteristically on pipe organ. Of the six tracks, the first five were recorded in May 2010 in St. Annenkirche in Zepernick and the sixth in June 2009 in Potsdam, where Vogel holds a university teaching position. The rationale for Abrahams' switch of instrument from piano to organ is explained by the duo's “explorations of both differences and similarities between the flute and organ." There are ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jon Rose / Chris Abrahams / Clayton Thomas: Artery

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Australian violinist and forward-minded improviser Jon Rose is the primary voice on this cleverly devised gala featuring his bandmates' oddball instrumentation, like the use by keyboardist Chris Abrahams (of the minimalist jazz-rock unit the Necks) of a harpsichord, forte piano and “positive organ to round out his partners' odd implementations.

This music is energetic, bizarre and exhilarating, though finesse might not be the right term here. It's more about frenetic in-your-face improvisation, catapulted by Rose's energized staccato lines and unusual ...