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Articles | Featured | Future

INTERVIEWS

Matt Davis: Big Family, Big Picture

Read "Matt Davis: Big Family, Big Picture" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

If there's a defining trait to be found in the value system guiding guitarist Matt Davis and his music, it's most definitely a healthy respect and admiration for kith and kin. A love of community and belonging drives nearly every aspect of this artist's life, including his flagship ensemble, Matt Davis' Aerial Photograph, and it speaks ever so clearly on the aptly named Big Family (Self Produced, 2019). This long- awaited album, visiting music from the past while highlighting tight ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Millennium Jazz Orchestra: Octopus

Read "Octopus" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Octopus, the tenth album released by the Millennium Jazz Orchestra in its nearly twenty-five years of impressive music-making in The Netherlands, is actually an eight-part suite by composer / arranger Joan Reinders devoted to one of the sea world's more fearsome and enigmatic creatures. The thematic essay spans the whole nine yards, from “Evolution" and “Environment" to “Food," “Procreation" and several diverting stops in between. It was recorded in concert in May 2018 at Theater Bouwkunde Deventer. ...

IN PICTURES
ALBUM REVIEWS

Four Letter Words: Pinch Point

Read "Pinch Point" reviewed by Mark Corroto

What is the difference between unbalanced and off balance? Very little, if you listen to Four Letter Words' Pinch Point, the trio's third release, after Blow (Amalgam, 2015) and Radio Silence (Amalgam, 2015). Unbalanced can mean both “disturbed" and “demented." Certainly the seven improvisations presented here can be a bit disturbing, meaning the music seeks no level nor stable meter. Let's not approach demented yet. Part of the newest of new wave Chicago improvisers, Four Letter Words are ...

RADIO

March Birthdays Including Nat Cole & Lennie Tristano Centennials

Read "March Birthdays Including Nat Cole & Lennie Tristano Centennials" reviewed by Marc Cohn

We've got a nice slug of celebrants to honor in addition to our 'centennialins.' Our best wishes go out to Bill Frisell (playing here with Andrew Cyrille and Wadada Leo Smith, Joe Locke, Charles Lloyd, and Roy Haynes (backing Sarah Vaughan). A very special shout out to Jessica Williams! Enjoy the show!Playlist Joe Locke “Litha" from Beauty Burning (Sirocco) 00:00 Nat King Cole “Sometimes I'm Happy" from After Midnight (Capitol) 07:32 Nat King Cole “The Lonely One" from ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Christoph Irniger Pilgrim: Crosswinds

Read "Crosswinds" reviewed by Don Phipps

With Crosswinds, Christoph Irniger's quartet Pilgrim offers a scintillating trip into a musical subconscious --a dream state where one opens doors only to find more doors --a spiral staircase where the top is always just beyond reach. For the most part, the album consists of tunes that are both sparse yet engaging. And it is this mix of idioms that makes the album so successful. Irniger's raspy breathing is often heard in his sax playing. His attacks are ...

RADIO

Movie Songs and Remembering Ethel Ennis

Read "Movie Songs and Remembering Ethel Ennis" reviewed by Mary Foster Conklin

The final day of station fundraising also included new releases from Mariel Austin, Emmet Cohen, Yelena Eckemoff and The Becoming Quintet with birthday shout outs to Nancy Wilson, Nina Simone, Warren Vache, Michel Legrand and Patti Wicks among others. Also women-penned movie songs to honor Oscar Night and remembering Ethel Ennis. Playlist Hal Schaefer and His Orchestra “The Moon Is Blue" from Jazz Goes to the Movies (Fresh Sounds Records) 00:00 Diane Hoffman I'm Gonna Go Fishin'" from ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Yelena Eckemoff/Manu Katché: Colors

Read "Colors" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Pianist/composer Yelena Eckemoff has produced a varied discography. But since her piano trio album Lions (L&H Production, 2015) she has tended towards larger ensembles. Leaving Everything Behind (L&H, 2016) and Desert (L&H, 2018) were both quartets; Blooming Tall Phlox (L&H, 2017) and In the Shadow of a Cloud (L&H, 2017) were quintets; and Better Than Gold And Silver (L&H, 2018) was a sextet (plus two vocalists for the vocal versions). So this is a surprising move: a duet with drummer ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Bodhisattwa Ghosh: The Grey Album

Read "The Grey Album" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

By incessantly stacking one post-rock ambiguity upon another, Calcutta's Bodhisattwa Trio's The Grey Album is anything but. Instead, The Grey Album is an animated aggregate of garage-band sound and fury determined to turn your head, prick your ears, and rattle your sensibilities while leading you through seven swirling, roiling, soundscapes. Injecting into the mix anything they can hear or have heard--drum and bass, ambient, free form jazz, trip hop, Indian classical and folk musics, electronics, etc--guitarist Bodhisattwa Ghosh, ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Michael Gregory Jackson Clarity Quartet: WHENUFINDITUWILLKNOW

Read "WHENUFINDITUWILLKNOW" reviewed by Troy Dostert

A guitarist with a prodigious recorded legacy and an omnivorous stylistic range, Michael Gregory Jackson's return to his avant-jazz roots during the past couple of decades has been a welcome, if under-recognized, development. While he cut his teeth in the '70s loft scene in the company of luminaries such as Wadada Leo Smith, Oliver Lake, Julius Hemphill, Pheeroan akLaff, and Fred Hopkins, Jackson was never content to remain locked into a particular genre, and his subsequent trajectory included a number ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Live Drummers From Old York: The Yamato Drummers Of Japan, Ensemble Bash & Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers

Read "Live Drummers From Old York: The Yamato Drummers Of Japan, Ensemble Bash & Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers" reviewed by Martin Longley

The Yamato Drummers Of Japan Grand Opera House February 18, 2019 The Yamato Drummers Of Japan tour regularly, a less august crew when compared to the old guard Kodō clan, more attuned to a modernised visual sense that makes their relationship with the taiko form less hardcore. Not that their drumming impact is much lesser: it's just that they travel beyond sweaty loincloth monomania, favouring the trappings of dance production or a rock show. ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Quinsin Nachoff's Flux: Path Of Totality

Read "Path Of Totality" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

Quinsin Nachoff is a saxophonist and composer who draws inspiration from the world around him. The 2017 solar eclipse, the 2016 American presidential election, Kenny Wheeler and John Cage all figured in the creation of the music on Path Of Totality, an ambitious program combining jazz, classical music and prog rock. It is performed by his group Flux, an impressive collection of forward-thinking musicians, Nachoff and David Binney on saxophone, Matt Mitchell on all manner of keyboards and both Kenny ...