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ALBUM REVIEWS

Sam Newbould Quintet: Blencathra

Read "Blencathra" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Blencathra, the debut album from British-born, Amsterdam-based saxophonist Sam Newbould's quintet, presents half a dozen of the leader's forward-leaning compositions and arrangements whose general point of view may be subdued, at times veering toward melancholy, but is never less than engaging. One of Newbould's strengths, even when the music is leisurely and pensive, lies in his ability to fully engage every member of the quintet in the ardent expression of its finer points. In other words, the group dynamic is ...

INTERVIEWS

Bruce Jones: Growing Up With Jazz

Read "Bruce Jones: Growing Up With Jazz" reviewed by La-Faithia White

The impact of living in a musical household, witnessing your dad and your uncles jamming in the basement can definitely create a positive and meaningful outlook for a young kid. Stories of growing up jazz come to mind for Bruce Jones, the eldest son of trumpeter, composer, and band leader Thad Jones. Bruce is also the nephew of pianist, arranger, composer and band leader Hank Jones, and nephew of drummer and band leader Elvin Jones.Bruce is the eldest ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Alberto Pibiri & Miriam Waks: So Many Stars

Read "So Many Stars" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

PIanist Alberto Pibiri and vocalist Miriam Waks' recording So Many Stars is a lesson in intimacy. They are an international couple, with Pibiri coming from Italy and Waks from the other side of the world, Australia. The two, married, make New York City their home. They obviously enjoy one another and performing together. They bring an intimacy to their performance. They are as fun as Broadway composers and lyricists singing their own show tunes, as smart as their polyglot song ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Tim Stine Quartet: Knots

Read "Knots" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Guitarist Tim Stine leads a democratically oriented quartet with progressive/free jazz Chicago heavyweights, providing a bit of credence to the album moniker since many of these pieces are woven together with incongruent angles and geometrical designs. With false endings, scrappy breakouts and off-metered pulses, the leader's intricate chordal and single note developments assist with maintaining an unpredictable or suspenseful array of unconventional works. The band occasionally veers off into diametrical and intersecting discourses, often intensified by saxophonist Nick ...

INTERVIEWS

Ruslan Sirota: A Journey Away

Read "Ruslan Sirota: A Journey Away" reviewed by Mackenzie Horne

Ruslan Sirota would bristle against the classification of “pianist," “multi-instrumentalist," or “composer." He is, of course, all of these things... which is precisely the point. Raised on the songs of the Soviet and nurtured by the fusion alumni of the 1960s, Sirota has thus far navigated his professional career with an acute sense of sound, unencumbered by futile terminology. This disregard for straitjacketing semantics extends from his musical tastes to his job description. He casts such inhibitors aside in the ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Adam Berenson: Every Beginning Is A Sequel

Read "Every Beginning Is A Sequel" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Pianist/keyboardist/composer Adam Berenson--across more than twenty recordings--offers incontrovertible evidence that talent surpasses an affinity for category. He is equally at home with jazz, electronica, blues, or a string quartet. On his previous , fully-acoustic album, Stringent and Sempiternal (Dream Works, 2019) Berenson went in an unusual direction (for him), covering works of Miles Davis, Bud Powell, Wayne Shorter, Thelonious Monk, and Pat Metheny. His new solo box set Every Beginning Is A Sequel is an ambitious collection of electronic music ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Nicolas Meier World Group: Peaceful

Read "Peaceful" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

London-based Swiss guitarist Nicolas Meier (heard mainly on nylon string guitar here) leads his World Group quartet in a program of his compositions. The group is well named, as Meier takes inspiration from all over the world; Turkish music, Middle Eastern music, samba, flamenco and tango all mix with jazz in this sound. “Besiktas Cafe" opens the set with a sprightly waltz, Meier executing the first of many technically difficult passages with a smile and a dance step. ...


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