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THE JAZZ LIFE

To Dream the Impossible Dream: the quest for a music education

Read "To Dream the Impossible Dream: the quest for a music education" reviewed by Peter Rubie

I've been thinking a lot about how jazz is taught recently. I realize now, my search for a real musical education was not a simple thing, but a series of life changing moments. My son, on the other hand, is planning to study music in college after he finishes high school. Though it would fill his grandparents with dread were they still around to see it, to Ben and his peers it is a natural choice, focused on finding the ...

THE VINYL POST

Coltrane 58: The Prestige Recordings

Read "Coltrane 58: The Prestige Recordings" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Some fifty-two years since his death, the shadow of John Coltrane looms large in the minds of many jazz fans and musicians. Over the past few years this has been aided and abetted by the fact that his music continues to be repackaged. In the case of last year's Both Directions at Once, some previously unissued sides even brought further clarity to the saxophonist's development at Impulse Records in the mid '60s. Concurrent with the fascination of all-things-Coltrane ...

LIVE REVIEWS

The Ben Paterson Trio At The Jazz Corner

Read "The Ben Paterson Trio At The Jazz Corner" reviewed by Martin McFie

Ben Paterson Trio The Jazz Corner Hilton Head Island, SC May 10-11, 2019 The Ben Paterson Trio set off with the lilting Ray Brown tune “FSR" (For Sonny Rollins). By the time they had finished the very first piece the audience was fully engaged in the performance. Paterson often includes soulful blues in his sets and likes to sing some of the numbers. Next, they played “Nobody Knows You When You're Down ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Paul Bley / Gary Peacock / Paul Motian: When Will The Blues Leave

Read "When Will The Blues Leave" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Had Paul Bley, Gary Peacock and Paul Motian recorded together more consistently, they would have been considered among the best piano trios in modern jazz history. The three first recorded on the ECM collection Paul Bley with Gary Peacock (1970), a compilation from the 1960s where three of the eight tracks had Billy Elgart on drums. It would be decades before the trio reunited in the studio, and again, ECM captured the session, Not Two, Not One (1998). When Will ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Judy Wexler: Crowded Heart

Read "Crowded Heart" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

For her fifth album, Judy Wexler has embraced a concept that's oddly foreign in the jazz vocal realm. Instead of walking her way down the all-too-familiar avenues for singers--classic Broadway-cum-jazz material, canonical works written by revered jazz figures, pop tunes reshaped with harmonic facelifts, self-penned originals--she takes the road less traveled by focusing on the work of jazz composers thriving in the present. In doing so she magnifies the importance of these artists, highlights material worthy of greater attention, and ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Domas Žeromskas: Infinite Itinerant

Read "Infinite Itinerant" reviewed by Geno Thackara

A title like Infinite Itinerant may seem like a premature (or even pretentious) statement coming from a player in his late teens, but Domas Žeromskas' sparkling debut shows that he's got enough ambition to back it up. The young leader's piano work smartly builds on past decades of swing and bop alongside contemporary hipness, and the all-original pieces follow suit. If this happy session is any indication, Žeromskas seems poised to live up to that exploratory promise. This is a ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Nicoló Ricci: Pulcino

Read "Pulcino" reviewed by Nicholas F. Mondello

With Pulcino saxophonist Nicoló Ricci bravely sets off on a musical excursion with only bassist Giuseppe Romagnoli and drummer Andreu Pitarch along for the adventure. The result is a fascinating portrait of an artist and players willing to forego the keyboard's harmonic support and cast improvisational fate to their own superior creativity. “The Superflourescent Boy" has Ricci and team exploring a brief theme and subsequently moving into a varying-tempoed, swingingly playful track. Ricci's inventiveness, egged on by ...

RADIO

Nichols, Newk with Kenny/Elmo, Prez & More

Read "Nichols, Newk with Kenny/Elmo, Prez & More" reviewed by Marc Cohn

We're rotating through our 2019 centenarians--this week Herbie Nichols with tracks from his first Blue Note LP. Our artist log tells me it's time for another deep dive into the vault, including another piano faceoff (because you loved the last one): this time Fats Waller versus Teddy Wilson & Art Tatum. There's more Newk too, recordings with Kenny Dorham & Elmo Hope from 1954. And Prez blows the clarinet with Basie live on 52nd Street. Of course, we've got 21st ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Festival International de Musique Actuelle de Victoriaville 2019, Part 1-2

Read "Festival International de Musique Actuelle de Victoriaville 2019, Part 1-2" reviewed by Mike Chamberlain

Festival International de Musique Actuelle de Victoriaville Victoriaville, Quebec, Canada May 16-19, 2019 There was a lot of positive buzz leading up to the 35th edition of the Festival International de Musique Actuelle de Victoriaville. On paper, the schedule looked very strong. Looking back over past editions of the venerable festival, one can see a general movement from the early editions, which featured mostly Quebec artists, through the 1990s, with its larger focus on free jazz ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

David Janeway: Hastings Jazz Collective/Shadow Dances

Read "Hastings Jazz Collective/Shadow Dances" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Sail twenty miles up the Hudson River from New York City and you find Hastings-On-The-Hudson, a vibrant artists' colony situated on the river's shore. Among the town's artists you'll find jazz pianist David Janeway, a New York City transplant via Detroit, Michigan. The Hastings Jazz Collective is Janeway's brainchild. He presents the all-star group's debut with Shadow Dances. Though he claims the title “musical director" of this contemporary mainstream jazz quintet, he also stresses the “leaderless aspect" of the group's ...

LIVE REVIEWS

The Justin Varnes Orchestra's Rhapsody In Blue At The Jazz Corner

Read "The Justin Varnes Orchestra's Rhapsody In Blue At The Jazz Corner" reviewed by Martin McFie

The Justin Varnes Orchestra The Jazz Corner Rhapsody in Blue Hilton Head Island, SC May 12, 2019For Mother's Day luncheon, The Jazz Corner presented another in their “Classical meets Jazz" series of concerts, “Rhapsody in Blue."The opening clarinet trill, a scale, then the slowly extruded glissando had the edgy, haunting quality of an emergency siren winding up to announce the theme. The opening measures of “Rhapsody in Blue" may be ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Lucas Pino's No Net Nonet: That's a Computer

Read "That's a Computer" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

Lucas Pino is a New York-based tenor saxophonist who leads the No Net Nonet, a band that fits snugly into the jazz tradition but displays its own style of creativity. Despite what this CD's title suggests, this group's music is full of emotion and warmth. That is evident from the outset with “Antiquity," written by alto saxophonist Alex LoRe; this is a floating melody that meshes undulating lines of tenor, piano and guitar together within a cocoon of ...


Giant Steps EP 2

Episode 2 No Respect. Kim is confronted with discrimination in jazz education while working at the Jazz Elders Foundation. Bid Daddy reams Manny for booking two singers at the same time and Mickey gets no respect in the movie business. Cast Mickey Bass, Dr. Jeff Gardere, Gregory Charles Royal, Mark 'Icewater' Gross, Paul Tafoya as 'Manny', Kimberly Singh, Zari Veres Royal and Marist Veres Royal -with James Zollar -trumpet, Bobby Lavell,- tenor sax Anthony Wonsey- piano, Mark Johnson - drums and Billy Johnson - bass.