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Ottawa Jazz Festival Day 7: June 27, 2007

John Kelman By

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In 2005, TD Canada Trust Ottawa International Jazz Festival Executive Director Catherine O'Grady introduced the Improv Invitational series, intended to bring a diversity of groups whose focus was on collective improvisation to the festival lineup. It's been a successful series and, while some past performances have been of the completely free variety, bassist John Geggie's show this year on Day 5 demonstrated that even so-called "free jazz" is not just about unstructured free play. Instead, many of the artists use unconventional constructs to help motivate the more unfettered explorations. This balance between structure and freedom could not have been more evident than on Day Seven of the 2007 OIJF, when the Dutch ICP (Instant Composers Pool) delivered a ninety-minute set that was at times paradoxically exhilarating, subtle, richly arranged and filled with reckless abandon.

Misha Mengelberg / ICP Orchestra

Founded in the late 1960s by woodwind multi-instrumentalist Willem Breuker, pianist Misha Mengelberg and drummer Han Bennink, the group has been something of a revolving door with some of the best of the Dutch avant-garde scene passing through over the years. Breuker is no longer with ICP, but Mengelberg and Bennink are, currently surrounded by an unorthodox group that includes a violinist/violist, cellist, double bassist, trumpet, trombone and three saxophonists/clarinetists. The orchestration provides for plenty of color, and some unusual instrumental subsets, as on the opening piece (a Mengleberg arrangement of a Herbie Nichols composition), on which trumpeter Thomas Heberer soloed in tandem with cellist Tristan Honsinger.



A book called New Dutch Swing (Billboard Books, 1998) describes the distinctive Dutch jazz scene as "Jazz + Classical + Absurdism," and it's no surprise that the cover features Bennink, truly one of the greatest improvising drummers alive—a combination of staggering technique, unerring feel and, at times, complete musical madness. Mengelberg also gets considerable attention, as he's been equally instrumental in developing an instantly recognizable approach that takes even the most familiar material and puts it through a prism that refracts it in new and unexpected ways.



The rest of the group consists of a number of younger but equally notable players—the cream, in fact, of the Dutch crop. Reedmen Michael Moore, Ab Baars and Tobias Delius (the latter two performing at both the 2007 Festival International de Musique Actuelle Victoriaville (FIMAV) with pianist Cor Fuhler's Corkestra, and trombonist Juis Boost's Astronotes at the 2006 OIJF) are equally notable, as are Honsinger, trombonist Walter Wierbos and bassist Ernst Glerum. Violinist/violist Mary Oliver (who also acted as MC to the audience, announcing the material) and trumpeter Thomas Heberer are more recent luminaries on the Dutch scene, but no less impressive than their better-known bandmates.

ICP Orchestra
l:r: Mary Oliver, Tristan Honsinger, Ernst Glerum, Walter Wierbos, Han Bennink, Tobias Delius, Ab Baars, Michael Moore



ICP is all about juxtaposition. At any given moment a seemingly anarchistic series of open-ended and bombastic improvs can morph into a defined pulse that makes the aggregation's debt to the jazz tradition crystal clear. An arranged woodwind chamber ensemble delivers something more closely related to contemporary classical music, but suddenly dissolves into a chaotic exchange, with everyone in the group back in the pool. Mengelberg's largely spare but no-less-twisted approach contrasts with Wierbos,' who delivered one of the set's most thrilling solos—taking the extended techniques that are commonly heard amongst trombonists and magnifying them exponentially.



The music was beautiful at times, jagged at others, but the skewed sense of the absurd definiing much of the Dutch avant-garde scene was never far from the surface. While it was a little tight fitting the dectet on The Fourth Stage's relatively small platform, its members made great use of the space. During this largely acoustic performance (only the piano, violin and viola were miked, with Glerum plugged into a bass amplifier), one frontline member would solo while the remaining musicians could be found at the back of the stage, creating shifting sound mixes naturally, much as reedman Peter BrÃtzmann's tentet did at the FIMAV in 2004.

Han Bennink / ICP Orchestra


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