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North Sea Jazz Festival 2015: The Roller Coaster Has Taken Off

North Sea Jazz Festival 2015:   The Roller Coaster Has Taken Off
Joan Gannij By

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Every continent has its own preferences, so there's always something new to discover, and that's what jazz is all about.
Jan Willem Luyken, Director of the North Sea Jazz Festival, has a lot to celebrate this year. It is not only the 40th anniversary of the popular festival, it's also the tenth anniversary of their move from the Hague to Rotterdam, and the year that Luyken became director. Described as "the world's largest indoor music festival," it attracts an international public of 75,000 during the music-packed weekend in mid-July at the Ahoy Rotterdam Arena complex.

No stranger to the festival, Luyken started going with his father in 1982 (when he was 14), and returned faithfully every year. He took on the position in 2005, a turbulent time when the press and the public were skeptical about the shift in location 13 miles down the road to the modern city that is known as "Manhattan on the Maas." There were a lot of challenges," he recalls. "It was the time of the recession and many companies had pulled their sponsorships. At the end of the day we did everything we could" (to make the move optimal and efficient). He's not just talking about transporting a few microphones and loud speakers. "It called for a lot of hard work on our part and it was a hell of a job. In addition to its original purpose as a sport area, the Ahoy is used for trade fairs and with all that glass and steel, is not perfectly suited for holding concerts. We had to install acoustic walls made of sheep's wool and make numerous changes to the décor. After that, it looked fantastic, however every year we have to build up the whole thing, and then break it down again at the end (note: which takes about three days)."

"It's a real success story, he says proudly. "We managed to keep the atmosphere of the North Sea Jazz Festival alive. And that was no small feat." Today it is considered one of the most successful and enduring festivals in the world, known globally as the event where the past, present and future of jazz are celebrated within three days. "It's all under one roof, with one ticket (except for certain Plus concerts that require the purchase of an extra ticket, for events featuring Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea, Jamie Cullum, Melody Gardot). There is a variety of 200-seat venues where you can have an intimate experience (indoors or outdoors) or see top artists like Stevie Wonder in a mega-hall that can accommodate 12.500."

For a few years, Jazz festivals from Newport to Monterey and Montreux were heavily criticized for getting too pop and mainstream oriented. Luyken responds: "We're still following the original concept of the founder, the late Paul Acket, who believed in having the right balance between art and entertainment. Acket was a charismatic business man and jazz lover who got the idea of opening multiple stages featuring simultaneous performances from a festival in the south of France, where people could walk back and forth from stage to stage. He thought to himself,'We need something like that in The Netherlands.' Only it would have to be indoors because of the uncertain weather. He found a suitable location in the Hague Conference Center, not far from the seaside resort of Scheveningen. There were nine stages in separate auditoriums and the festival caught on quickly. After just a few years the center was bursting at the seams and in 1988, a large concert hall was added on which increased visitors from 9,000 to 25,000 a day. In 2001, the center was sold to a private developer who made numerous changes to the buildings, making it impossible to hold the festival there anymore." The rest, as they say, is history.

Luyken pragmatically concludes: "If you want to stay alive as a festival, you have to be on top of the new trends in music, to attract young crowds who connect with Hip Hop and electronic music and are not tied to any musical boundaries, certainly less than before the 60s and 70s. It's one of the advantages of these times to offer the diversity, and the crowds and the musicians are very eclectic these days. It's about introducing new artists to an older public, and older cats to the new generation." And sadly, he acknowledges that the older cats are diminishing.

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