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Martin Taylor: Nitelife

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Martin Taylor: Nitelife For those who are only familiar with Martin from his Grappelli days or solo performances "Nitelife" may be a shock. If you are a Martin Taylor fan and have been following his career you will see the natural progression of a creative jazz musician.

This album is infectious and the more you listen to it the more it grows on you. Here are just a few highlights of what to expect.

The album opens with the original tune "Chaff & Grain" that has a groove that sets the tone for the rest of the album. On this track Martin and Kirk Whalum trade guitar and sax lines in the true jazz style with a ease and fluidity that only great masters of their instrument can do—with that groove making you tap your foot and nod your head.

The second tune, "Doctor Spin" starts with a Delta Blues type slide guitar that immediately makes you sit up and take notice. Martin enters seamlessly blending his style into the groove. The tune also features strong trumpet work. Martin then covers the tune "That’s the Way of the World" with great melodic octave work that reminds you of what an improvised solo is all about.

For all his fans that want to hear Martin’s unique solo guitar technique you will not be disappointed as he performs two tracks "Hymne A L’Amour" with string section introduction and ending that is simply gorgeous and "I Get Along Without You Very Well". These are jaw dropping as usual with a sound and sensitivity that only Martin is capable of.

A number of tracks incorporate the London DJ Fink into the mix. Martin is now totally breaking down the jazz barriers and these can be quite unusual to the conservative jazz listener, but they do become additive, The more you listen the more you realize where they are coming from and there unique creativity.

One of my favorite tracks is Celtic style original by Martin, "Across the Pond". In this tune all the stops are pulled out and I don’t know what else musically could transpire. A traditional vocal chorus is introduced in the introduction, acoustic guitars, and synthesizers and about every other instrument imaginable is incorporated. A tremendous Tenor sax solo emanates by Jim Horn with Martin weaving his magic throughout with that Celtic drone emanating under it all.

This album is definitely breaking musical boundaries for Martin and the world of jazz guitar. Martin Taylor is still the same great creative guitarist we have grown to admire over the years, but is simply adjusting with the times and it suits him well.


Title: Nitelife | Year Released: 2001 | Record Label: Artists Own


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