169

Red Priest: Nightmare in Venice

C. Michael Bailey By

Sign in to view read count
Red Priest: Nightmare in Venice

Classical Music With A Sense Of Humor, Part II

Priest on the Run was the Baroque quartet Red Priest’s first recording for Dorian, released in the late 1990s. It was a thematic affair based on Antonio Vivaldi’s flight from Venice at the time the composer was going abroad, assembled from the pens of the finest composers of the Baroque era. For the present compilation, Red Priest turns its attention to the spooky, the frightening, the downright scary. Nightmare in Venice is a deliciously Baroque Halloween-fest if there ever was one. Replete with hissing and catcalls, this disc is a chiller.



Image is not everything, though Red Priest has that quality in spades. This is a quartet of the best Baroque specialists the United Kingdom has to offer. Although Red Priest was praised by Gramophone Magazine, the group also received criticism for basically not being serious. That seems to be precisely the point. Classical music has ceased being fun (presuming that it ever was fun to begin with). What Red Priest has done is to market itself brilliantly to the young and educated crowd able to recognize not only their musical brilliance, but their promotional brilliance as well. Nightmare in Venice is splendid for no other reason than it brings together the more gothic compositions of all of the greatest composers of an artistic and philosophic era. Much of the music presented here looks forward towards Romanticism, skipping classicism altogether.



After hearing Priest on the Run, I thought to myself, "I hope these guys never record The Four Seasons one more time." But times has passed, and at this point I cannot wait to hear their Seasons. I suspect it will be a greater kick in the pants than Il Giardino Armonico (Electra/Asylum 1998). Red Priest is currently on tour delivering the Seasons in a way only they can—with grace, panache, and cojones this BIG.



Visit Red Priest and Dorian Records .


Track Listing: The Nightmare Concerto ["La Notte"] in G Minor RV 439 (Antonio Vivaldi); English Fantasy Suite (Robert Johnson/Nicholas Lestrange); Sonata A Tre In A Minor (Giovanni Paola Cima); Concerto Grosso In A Minor, RV 522 (Antonio Vivaldi); Suite From The Fairy Queen (Henry Purcell); Sonata Decima (Dario Castello); Suite Form Scylla Et Glaucus (Jean-Marie Leclair).

Personnel: Piers Adams

Title: Nightmare in Venice | Year Released: 2003 | Record Label: Dorian Recordings


Tags

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Read The Company I Keep CD/LP/Track Review The Company I Keep
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: June 28, 2017
Read Ma De Re Sha CD/LP/Track Review Ma De Re Sha
by Geno Thackara
Published: June 28, 2017
Read Ask Seek Knock CD/LP/Track Review Ask Seek Knock
by Roger Farbey
Published: June 28, 2017
Read Air and Light and Time and Space CD/LP/Track Review Air and Light and Time and Space
by John Eyles
Published: June 28, 2017
Read Eleven Cages CD/LP/Track Review Eleven Cages
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: June 27, 2017
Read Afro-Caribbean Mixtape CD/LP/Track Review Afro-Caribbean Mixtape
by Mark F. Turner
Published: June 27, 2017
Read "Astrometrics" CD/LP/Track Review Astrometrics
by Roger Farbey
Published: May 13, 2017
Read "Tangle" CD/LP/Track Review Tangle
by John Eyles
Published: December 3, 2016
Read "Silk & Steel" CD/LP/Track Review Silk & Steel
by Budd Kopman
Published: October 24, 2016
Read "You'll Never Know" CD/LP/Track Review You'll Never Know
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: January 31, 2017
Read "Illegal Crowns" CD/LP/Track Review Illegal Crowns
by John Sharpe
Published: December 10, 2016
Read "Super Petite" CD/LP/Track Review Super Petite
by Glenn Astarita
Published: July 17, 2016

Smart Advertising!

Musician? Boost your visibility at All About Jazz and drive traffic to your website with our Premium Profile service.