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Instrumental Bass Guitar & Vibraphone Duo Cliffwalker 'Casually Skirts Past Math Rock, Jazz, And Minimalist Classical Like Ships In The Night' With 'Calm Sea' Video, Streaming Now

Instrumental Bass Guitar & Vibraphone Duo Cliffwalker 'Casually Skirts Past Math Rock, Jazz, And Minimalist Classical Like Ships In The Night' With 'Calm Sea' Video, Streaming Now

Courtesy Cliff Hayes and A. Walker Spring

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A breath of fresh air and a deeply nostalgic look into the 1960’s aesthetic. Comparisons to espionage composers like John Barry or Lalo Schifrin.
—Fecking Bahamas
Cliffwalker
“A breath of fresh air and a deeply nostalgic look into the 1960’s aesthetic,” says music discovery website Fecking Bahamas about the “Calm Sea” music video by Portland, Oregon-based “crime jazz” duo, CLIFFWALKER. “Comparisons to espionage composers like John Barry or Lalo Schifrin... The duo casually skirts past math rock, jazz, and minimalist classical like ships in the night.”

About the cinematic clip, CLIFFWALKER’s Cliff Hayes explains, “Kyros Papavassiliou, the co-writer and director of the film ‘Impressions of a Drowned Man’ is a dear friend, and I admire his work as an artist and filmmaker. The film has many ties to water and I see it as highlighting two things: Living your life with intention and care, and being content with the choices you make.”

Papavassiliou gave his blessing for the use of clips from ‘Impressions of a Drowned Man’ to form the “Calm Sea” video. Of the film itself, Papavassiliou adds, “The film is about the responsibility towards the preciousness of life, and about the responsibility of offering without waiting for something in exchange, i.e. the function of poetry and art in general that is almost forgotten in our times.”

More about CLIFFWALKER

While Cliff Hayes was working to become a top-notch Jazz bassist in his early college years by “practicing a lot of scales and arpeggios and reading a lot of charts,” he was also immersed in all kinds of music as a record store employee, the guilty party in so many musicians’ burgeoning career paths.

“Nearly all my waking moments were spent playing, listening, or learning about music,” he remembers.

Hayes relocated to Portland in 2005 and some years later, via fleeting meetings at the gigs of mutual friends, found himself in a conversation about artificial intelligence with a producer friend of A. Walker Spring.

“I was discussing how AI could be created to produce music by feeding it a library of riffs to train itself,” Hayes says.

Soon after, Hayes started recording his riffs at home with this idea in mind, and eventually wondered if Spring might be interested in playing drums with him on some material.

“Before I left that first session, we had already started recording the basic bass, drums and vibes that are on the final EP.”

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