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Caspar BrŲtzmann: Mute Massaker

Mark Corroto By

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: Mute Massaker They say the 21st century has less irony and angst, more sincerity. Maybe if you are riding a huge IPO to Bill Gates-land, yes. Otherwise, I believe it remains the battle of us against McDonalds, Disney, and Brittney Spears. Apparently Caspar Brötzmann feels the same as evidenced by his newly-formed trio. Son of Peter Brötzmann, one of the greatest free-jazz saxophonists alive, Caspar chose a different direction. As customary for any baby boomer, he plays electric guitar. Brass and woodwinds seem so analog as compared to the cauldron he stirs via the guitar and amp.

Brötzmann formed Massaker in the late-1980s with two friends and went on to record Koksofen and tour extensively. He has since recorded solo projects. For this date he has reformed a trio with new members Robert Damming, drums and Ottmar Seum, bass. His music can be described as post-Hendrix meditations (as in John Coltrane's Meditations). Mute Massaker is a series of six lengthy guitar feedback pieces, heavy on mood, paced for an overcast setting. Brötzmann reminds me at time of Jimmy Page and the power that Led Zeppelin held over their fans. Brötzmann doesn't indulge us in Led Zeppelin's rock beats, but stretches the times out for effect.

Like his famous father, Caspar knows how to build tension over a lengthy improvisation by shear volume and endurance. With bass slowly thumping and the slow beat of the drum, you can envision Caspar as an Albert Ayler figure leading his apocalyptic march. The Ayler image reoccurs throughout this recording, with Brötzmann readjusting your ears through the simplest of progressions. "Indians" starts innocently with beautiful (quiet) notes, only to be displaced by the boom-boom-boom of the drums and a noisy feedback of a Hendrix kneeling solo.

Years after giving up on the possibilities of the electric guitar, I find Caspar Brötzmann to be a spark of much need creative dissonance.


Track Listing: Mute Massaker; Cheyenne; Pearl Of Utah; Indians; Rain; Woodstock Hymne.

Personnel: Caspar BrŲtzmann, Guitar; Robert Damming, Drums; Ottmar Seum, Bass.

Year Released: 2002 | Record Label: Thirsty Ear Recordings | Style: Modern Jazz


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